Australian Missing Persons Register      

                       Victoria Missing Persons

                         - Children, 0-12 years

                  
           

            Linda STILWELL                                    Eloise WORLEDGE           

                                                                         

                 

                      Victoria Missing Persons

                          - Teenagers, 13-17 years

 

                   

Siriyakorn "Bung" SIRIBOON

 

                                  

          Anna Banitskas     Sophie WOODMAN            Prue BIRD          Terry FLOYD        Raymond ALLEN                   Cherie WESTELL

 

  

     Suzanne LAWRANCE

 

 

If you have seen any of the people on these pages please call Crimestoppers on 1800 333 000, or the National Missing Persons Co-ordination Centre on 1800 000 634, or your local Police.

 

I can be contacted by e mail - nicole@australianmissingpersonsregister.com or phone - 0422 341 955 but if you have any information about any missing person please contact Police on the numbers above.

 

*Please note - if you find someone on my website who you know has been located PLEASE contact me so I can remove them.

 

 

Police urge missing Victorians to make contact

 
Monday, 01 August 2011 13:37
 

More than 7000 Victorians went missing last year – and research shows that for every person reported missing, at least another 12 people are affected.

Victoria Police has joined an Australia-wide campaign being launched this week as part of National Missing Persons Week (31 July – 6 August) to help highlight the impact of missing persons on family, friends the community.

In 2010-11, 7280 people went missing in Victoria. Of those, 4139 missing persons in Victoria were aged 17 or younger and more than 3000 were aged 18 or over.

Detective Superintendent Brett Guerin said police were appealing to anyone with information, or anyone who suspected they may be reported as a missing person, to make contact.

“There can be a huge impact on families, friends and colleagues – emotionally, financially, physically or psychologically – when someone they love goes missing.

“All those questions unanswered: What has happened? Where are they? Are they safe?

“We realise that some people reported as missing don’t ever want to be found. It’s not the role of police to judge these situations. Our role is to simply establish that a missing person is alive, safe and well.

“In cases where people don’t wish to contact their family or friends, we ask them to contact their local police station. It’s a way to let family and friends know they’re okay without having to make direct contact or reveal where they are living.”

Det Supt Guerin said while a large percentage of people reported as missing to police were quickly located safe and well, Victoria Police had concerns for a small number of unresolved cases.

“Any small piece of information can help police in a missing persons’ case. It may be a possible sighting or another small detail that could be the final link police need,” he said.

To report someone missing, contact your local police. If it is an emergency situation, such as a child or elderly person has gone missing, call Triple Zero (000) for immediate assistance.

If you know where a person who has been reported missing is, or you have any information about a missing person, call Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000.

National Missing Persons Week is an annual campaign coordinated by the Australian Federal Police, National Missing Persons Coordination Centre, to raise awareness of the significant issues associated with missing persons in Australia.

More profiles of missing Victorians can be found at www.missingpersons.gov.au

 

Victoria Police statistics show 6908 people were reported missing between July 1, 2005, and June 30, 2006. Almost half of these — 3116 — were aged 17 or younger. In 2004-05, 2717 Victorian kids went missing.