Terry FLOYD

     - The corner of the Pyrenees Hwy where 12-year-old Terry Floyd was last seen on June 28, 1975. Picture: Jeremy Bannister, The Courier

                                                                                                                                

Sheryle Cain kisses the picture of her brother Terry every night. Next to her is a family photo.               Daryl Floyd, photo from The Courier.

 

Click here for ABC radio interview with Terry's brother Daryl, January 31st 2012

 

 

Posted at 8:56 AM September 15, 2010

"I am Jennifer Fildes (Floyd) the eldest sister of the Floyd family. We all want closure on the disappearance of our brother , Terry. These last 35 years have been a nightmare. Our parents have died, never knowing what happened to their son. For those of us remaining, the search goes on. I hope the guilty mongrel is finally caught and that we all can have a chance to bury our little brother, so that he can rest in peace."

 

Missing boy mystery still

BY ANDREW EALES
30 Nov, 2001 12:52 AM

 

TWENTY-SIX years after the disappearance of a Maryborough boy, new evidence has surfaced this week which could yet lead to a conviction in the case.

An inquest at Melbourne Coroners Court yesterday heard how police were continuing to interview witnesses this week about the disappearance of 12-year-old Terry James Floyd, who was last seen at the intersection of the Sunraysia and Pyrenees Highways near Avoca on Saturday, June 28, 1975 about 5pm.

The inquest was told that a man known as ''Unc'', widely believed to have some involvement in Floyd's disappearance, had been cleared of playing any part.

Homicide Squad Detective Senior Sergeant Ron Iddles told the inquest that Francis Robert Drake, who died in 1991, and believed to be ''Unc'', had an alibi and that evidence against him was unable to be substantiated.

Det Sen Sgt Iddles said more people were likely to be interviewed following the discovery of the new evidence.

Earlier this year Det Sen Sgt Iddles interviewed Russell Kenneth Jones, who was staying at Maryborough at the time and now lives in Red Cliffs.

Jones was initially interviewed in the days following Floyd's disappearance, admitting he had been in Avoca on the day in question and he had been driving a 1969 Holden panel van, fawn in colour.

''Jones was on bail at the time for offences of indecent assault, as a result of assaulting a young boy in a toilet block in Ballarat,'' Det Sen Sgt Iddles said.

''He was convicted of this offence and sentenced to two years' imprisonment.''

He said on the account given by Jones, there was a strong possibility he would have seen Floyd on June 28, 1975.

Jones was interviewed on May 10 this year, and denied any involvement in the disappearance of Floyd.

Coroner Francis Hender yesterday found Floyd had likely died from unknown causes at an unknown place at an unknown time.

Mr Hender said the inquest could be re-opened if new information came to hand.

Outside court, Det Sen Sgt Iddles said it was still possible that someone could face charges in court.

''There are some other avenues to be explored and I'm confident that I'm going in the right direction.''

While the inquest provided some solace for the brothers and sisters of Floyd, they said only locating his body would finally put the matter to rest.

''We want to be able to bury him with our mother and father,'' sister Sheryl Cain said.

The coroner heard that Terry Floyd was a normal 12-year-old boy attending Maryborough Technical School who argued with his parents from time to time, but was no different to other children of the same age.

His parents, Ken and Dororthy have passed away since Terry's disappearance.

His brother Daryl and sisters Debbie and Sheryl attended yesterday's inquest.

On the day of his disappearance, Floyd had played football with Rovers under-15s at Maryborough's Jubilee Park before being driven from Alma to Avoca by a person he referred to as his uncle.

After playing with friends that afternoon in Avoca, he was taken to the intersection of the Sunraysia and Pyrenees Highways where, according to witnesses, he began to hitchhike to Maryborough.

Three witnesses saw a boy hitchhiking at about 5pm, all of whom also reported seeing a white Holden panel van or utility in the area.

Until this week, no-one had reported seeing Floyd after that time. But Det Sen Sgt Iddles, said another person recently interviewed had claimed to see a boy fitting Floyd's description early on Sunday, June 29.

More than 200 people have been interviewed regarding the disappearance since June 1975.

Loved ones missing but never forgotten

3/08/2009 9:29:00 AM - Bendigo Advertiser

 

SHERYLE Cain still remembers the day her brother Terry Floyd disappeared as if it was yesterday.

Terry, then 12, was last seen alive on Saturday, June 28, 1975.

“I can’t wrap my head around that - that, yes, I do have a brother who has been missing for all of these years,” she said.

“You know, we were just a normal family, with Mum and Dad and six kids.

“Thirty-four years later, with Terry’s body never found, the family is still looking for answers.

“I don’t think that he’d still be alive,” Ms Cain said.

Terry grew up in Maryborough, one of six children to parents Ken and Dorothy Floyd.

“He was cheeky, he didn’t like going to school,” she said.

“He was a bit defiant at times and he always seemed to be in trouble.”

On the day he went missing, Terry played football for the Maryborough Rovers under 15s at Jubilee Oval, just like he did every other Saturday morning.

But instead of going with his teammates to watch the seniors play at Harcourt, he made his way to Avoca - about 25km from Maryborough - and visited a school acquaintance, Greg Jess.

Mrs Jess offered Terry a ride home, but he said that he didn’t need one, because his “Unk” was picking him up at the intersection of the Pyrenees and Sunraysia highways at 4.30pm.

Greg Jess accompanied Terry to the crossroads, and left him leaning against a white post.

At his mother’s request, Greg returned some 15 minutes later to check on Terry.

Greg saw him walking towards Maryborough.

He had no idea that this would be the last time Terry would be seen alive.

There are several reported sightings about this time of a young boy being near a white or cream-coloured panel van or ute with a canopy.

“We just assumed that he got into that car,” Ms Cain said.

At 7.30 that night, Terry’s parents reported him missing to Maryborough police.

Twelve years later to the minute, Mrs Floyd died from a brain tumour.

“The doctors in Melbourne said that it would have been from constant worry,” Ms Cain said.

If it’s possible to have a peaceful death, she believes that her mother had one.

“She told her sister not to worry, that she could see Terry standing at the end of the hospital bed,” Ms Cain said.

“They had removed 80 per cent of her brain. She didn’t recognise any of us, but she could see Terry.”

Ms Cain said it was important to her parents’ memory that she find out what happened to her brother.

“That’s all they ever wanted, was to find him,” she said.

“Mum always said 'I want to find my boy so that I can bury him’.”

Ms Cain said that after 34 years of living without knowing what happened, it hadn’t gotten any easier.

“As soon as you hear on the news or radio that there have been bones found, you think, 'Oh my god, where was that?’

“If they’ve found skeletal remains somewhere you just always pick up and think you’ll get a phone call that your brother’s bones have been found.

“It never, ever leaves you. You never stop thinking about them.”

Ms Cain said that over the years, countless avenues had been explored.

“You get a little bit of information and you think 'oh god, this is it’.

“So you go and follow it through, and it’s nothing.

“It’s mentally and physically draining.”

These ups and downs have included the completion of an inquest in 2001 and watching a Bet Bet property being excavated in 2003 after a tip that Terry’s remains were there.

The search proved fruitless and the inquest, though thorough, did not result in a conclusion.

“It’s just left as an open finding because there has been no body found and not one person that they can pinpoint it on,” Ms Cain said.

“It’s sort of gone off on all different tangents over the years on different suspects.”

One such suspect was the man that Terry referred to as “Unk”, but investigations eventually eliminated him.

Ms Cain believes that the person responsible for Terry’s disappearance is still out there.

“We’ve been told it’s only a matter of time, because most people who murder like to brag to somebody about it,” she said.

Even if the truth about that day eventually comes to light, Ms Cain isn’t certain it will bring peace to her and her family.

"What will happen to me when it’s solved I don’t know, because this is what my whole life has been,” she said.

As if dealing with Terry’s disappearance wasn’t enough for the Floyd family to cope with, the community was not always supportive, Ms Cain said.

“What my mother and father went through, having people stare at them in the street and being pointed at and saying `that’s Terry Floyd’s parents’.

“They had stigma involved as well, because nobody knew what happened to him.

“If he was killed in a car accident people would have been saying `poor Mrs Floyd’.

“But it was always the whispers that Mum couldn’t handle.”

Ms Cain hopes that her brother’s disappearance won’t be unsolved for much longer.

“I don’t want to leave this earth and not know what’s happened to him,” she said.

If you have information about the disappearance of Terry Floyd, or any other missing person, contact Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000.

Relative unsure of missing boy's fate

05 Apr, 2010 11:52 PM - The Courier

 

TERRY James Floyd was just 12 when he disappeared from the roadside at Avoca in 1975.

A 2001 Melbourne Coroners Court inquest heard how police continued to interview witnesses the week before the inquest into Terry's disappearance.

Terry was last seen at the intersection of the Sunraysia and Pyrenees highways, near Avoca, at 5pm on Saturday, June 28, 1975.

Coroner Francis Hender found Terry had likely died from unknown causes at an unknown place at an unknown time.

Mr Hender said the inquest could be re-opened if new information came to hand.

While the inquest found that Terry likely died, no body has been found and his family still lives in hope he will one day walk through the door.

Despite more than three decades since his disappearance, one relative is still undecided about the young boy's fate.

"He may be dead, like some people and the police think, but he could also be working in the mines at Coober Pedy," said the relative, who did not want to be named.

Terry was the third child of eight _ five boys and three girls _ of Ken and Dorothy Floyd of Maryborough.

His relative who spoke with The Courier believes the boy travelled to Avoca to see a girlfriend.

"A friend's parents were travelling to Avoca from Maryborough on that day and saw a boy walking on the side of the road. They were about to stop, but another car pulled over and Terry got in. That was the last time Terry was seen," the relative said.

During the search, police scoured bushland and crawled into mineshafts in the hopes of finding a trace of the Form 1 (now Year 7) boy from Maryborough High School.

Weeks and months went by and the search was eventually called off.

"We always thought Terry would come back. We didn't think that it was going to be the last time we would hear from him," Terry's relative said.

"I always got the impression he caught transport and headed to Adelaide.

"He was a robust kid, who got into a lot of mischief, like any kid at that age, but he always got on well with his family.

"He joined in a lot of school activities and was pretty good at sports, particularly football."

Terry's parents died many years ago without knowing their son's whereabouts.

"If Terry is still alive and walked down the streets of Maryborough today, no one would know that he was Terry Floyd. After 30 years, no one would recognise him," his relative said.

 

Terry Floyd's brother Daryl never stopped digging for the tragic truth

POLICE believe convicted paedophile Raymond Kenneth Jones may have got away with murder 35 years ago.

New evidence implicates Jones in the abduction and killing of missing Victorian schoolboy Terry Floyd.

An old gold mine near Avoca is about to be excavated on the strength of information that suggests the body of 12-year-old Terry might have been dumped down it.

Legal constraints prevent the Herald Sun from being able to reveal details of some of the evidence against Jones.

Prominent clinical psychiatrist Alan Bartholomew warned a judge in 1975 - the year Terry disappeared - that Jones was capable of murder.

Jones, 58, has been a suspect in the case for years, but police have so far been unable to get enough evidence to charge him with Terry's murder.

The Herald Sun recently tracked Jones down to a small town near Mildura.

He insisted he wasn't involved in Terry's disappearance and had nothing to fear from the new search for Terry's body.

"I've just about had a belly full of it all. I'm not going to just elaborate on anything," Jones said.

"I've bloody got nothing to hide, it's just that I'm bloody that sick of it all. I had nothing to do with it."

Police and Terry Floyd's brother Daryl have separately discovered information that strengthens the link between Jones and the 1975 disappearance of Terry.

That information doesn't mean Jones is necessarily guilty, but it does firm him as a suspect in police eyes.

It was the new leads that led to Daryl Floyd and his family recently deciding to pay for the search of the disused mine in the hope of finding Terry's body.

There have been unsuccessful searches for Terry's body in the past, the last one in 2003, but Mr Floyd said this latest search was based on what he believed was credible new information gathered since then.

"One of the new leads is that I was told by a reliable source that Terry's body was dumped down this mine and the person who told me is somebody who is in a position to have access to such information," Mr Floyd said.

With the support of Victoria Police, Mr Floyd

has been able to get permission from the Department of Sustainability and Environment to excavate the 20m deep Morning Star mine at Bung Bong Hill, near Avoca.

The excavation is due to start within days and is expected to take weeks.

Mr Floyd said he also hoped the search would discover forensic evidence that would result in charges finally being laid over the death of his missing brother.

"There might be some blood on Terry's clothing, or some other DNA evidence. There might be a weapon down there," he said.

"The main purpose for the search is to see if Terry's body is down there, but if we can also find some other evidence that would be a blessing because we have gone through 35 years without knowing what happened to Terry."

Victoria Police did not consider the information gathered by Mr Floyd about the possible burial site was strong enough for it to organise and pay for excavation of the mine.

But veteran homicide squad detective Ron Iddles has been working closely with Mr Floyd and helped him get permission to carry out the search.

If the search finds Terry's body, or any other evidence, then Sen-Sgt Iddles will arrange forensic tests through Victoria Police and will follow up the leads.

Sen-Sgt Iddles identified Jones as possibly being the person responsible for abducting Terry and interviewed him about the case in 2001.

" I came across information, which came from Buster Allen (a friend of Jones who is now dead) and I'll put it to you that he told people that you were responsible for the actual death of Terry Floyd," he told Jones.

"That you placed him in a mine shaft somewhere near Bung Bong Hill. What do you say to that?" Jones replied: "Nothing, it's a lie."

Sen-Sgt Iddles said: "On the account given by Jones, when he was travelling from Avoca to Maryborough, there is a strong possibility he would have seen Floyd, although he denies this."

He said he would love to solve the mystery and even after 35 years he was still hopeful charges would eventually be laid.

"We never close the file on unsolved crimes like the disappearance of Terry Floyd and we are always prepared to act when new leads come in," Sen-Sgt Iddles said.

People with information can contact Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000.

Mineshaft search for boy's remains after 35 years

BY MARCUS POWER - The Courier
01 Oct, 2010 01:34 AM

 

EXCAVATION of a mineshaft near Avoca will start this month in a bid to solve the 35-year-old mystery of a missing boy.

Terry James Floyd, 12, disappeared from a country road at Avoca on Saturday June 28, 1975.

He was last seen at the intersection of the Pyrenees and Sunraysia Highways about 5pm that day.

A 2001 coronial inquest found Terry had likely died from unknown causes at an unknown place at an unknown time.

Terry's brother Daryl, who was 10 at the time of Terry's disappearance, believes an old mineshaft at Bung Bong may hold the answer to the mystery.

Information he has received in recent months has led him to believe his brother's body may have been dumped down the shaft.

He said the search for Terry had taken a toll on his family.

He said the stress had contributed to the premature death of his mother, Dorothy Floyd.

She died, aged 56, 12 years to the day after Terry went missing.

''Every year that comes around we don't have just the one anniversary for Terry it's also my mum's anniversary as well,'' Mr Floyd said.

Mining records indicate the mine, which is in a state forest, was last active in 1920.

But it was used as a dump for sewerage in the 1960s and early 1970s.

Mr Floyd has the approval of Victoria Police and the Department of Sustainability and Environment for the excavation.

He also has permission from the South Australian mining company which holds the lease on the mine.

A Maldon-based mine excavation company will perform the excavation.

Once the excavation begins, a vet will be on site to identify animal bones at the site.

In the event any human remains are found, police will be called in.

 

Digging up Terry Floyd's past

EXCAVATION experts hope to find the body of schoolboy Terry Floyd, who disappeared 35 years ago, when they start digging in a disused gold mine.

Terry, 12, disappeared while hitchhiking from Avoca to his Maryborough home in 1975.

The Herald Sun revealed last month that new evidence implicated convicted paedophile Raymond Kenneth Jones.

Jones, 58, has been a suspect for years, but police have have not had enough evidence to charge him with murder.

Jones recently told the Herald Sun he wasn't involved in Terry's disappearance.

Terry's brother, Daryl, has spent decades investigating the case and has discovered evidence suggesting Terry's body may have been dumped in the 20m-deep Morning Star mine.

Police did not consider the information gathered by Mr Floyd strong enough to commission the dig.

Since the Herald Sun article last month several local people and businesses, including excavator Ballarat Coates Hire, have donated fencing and other equipment. The excavation is still expected to cost the Floyd family about $20,000.

Veteran homicide squad detective Ron Iddles has organised for a detective and a crime scene examiner to be at the mine site.

"If a bone or bones are found, the crime scene examiner will take a photograph and email it to the pathologist. If the bone appears to be human we will declare it to be a crime scene," he said.

Daryl Floyd said he had a strong feeling Terry's body was in the mine, but realised the search might not find anything.

"If we find something then my family can have closure. Terry can have a burial and be laid to rest with our parents," Mr Floyd said.

 

Mine to be searched for missing boy's remains

Posted Fri Oct 15, 2010 9:35am AEDT - ABC

Excavation work at a mine shaft in Avoca will start tomorrow, to search for the remains of a boy who went missing 35 years ago.

Terry Floyd was 12 years old when he disappeared at Avoca, west of Maryborough in in 1975.

His brother Daryl is paying for the excavation work because he says he is confident his brother's remains are in the mine.

"Very anxious at the moment. It's a weird feeling, not knowing how to be. Yes, very anxious in the outcome and that type of thing but at the same time very hopeful. We'll see what comes ... of that," he said.

Mine grave: man thinks he's found site of brother's body

KIM QUINLAN - The Courier
16 Oct, 2010 12:00 AM

 

EXCAVATION of an old mineshaft near Avoca begins today in the hopes of solving a 35-year mystery.

Preliminary works were carried out in recent weeks to ensure the shaft in a state forest at Bung Bong Hill was structurally sound for an excavation crew to work in during the painstaking search for the body of Maryborough boy, Terry James Floyd, who disappeared in 1975.

Terry, then aged 12, was last seen on Saturday, June 28, 1975, standing on the roadside of the Pyrenees Highway, seven kilometres from Avoca.

His younger brother Daryl, who was 10 at the time, strongly believes the mineshaft, only 500 metres from where Terry was last seen, is the final resting place of the cheeky, well-liked boy.

After years of researching the case, scrutinising the 254-page police brief on his brother's disappearance and following new information received in recent months, Daryl believes his brother's body may be down the shaft.

The Department of Sustainability and Environment and the mine's lease-holder, a South Australian mining company, have given permission for Daryl to excavate the shaft. The search also has the approval of Victoria Police.

Daryl is spending tens of thousands of dollars of his own money to find his brother's remains, while generous business owners have donated vital items to be used in the search, including machinery and security fencing.

Steven and Brooke Burchell, a father-and-daughter excavation crew from Compact Mining at Maldon, will begin work tomorrow to start removing 35 years' worth of rubbish dumped in the 20 metre-deep shaft. During preliminary works rubbish removed from the shaft mouth included oil cans and drums, carpet, clothes and household rubbish. One rubbish skip has already been filled.

The Burchells are expected to clear about a metre of rubbish each day and Daryl believes his brother’s remains could be as far down as 17 or 18 metres.

Once the excavation begins, a vet will be on site to identify animal bones. In the event any human remains are found, police will be called in.

Victoria Police said there are no solid facts to support the belief that the body of Terry is in the disused mine, a police spokesman said yesterday.

“This is the reason Victoria Police decided not to fund the cost of the excavation,’’ the spokesman said.

“The Terry Floyd case remains open and police are always prepared to act on new information and commit resources where appropriate.’’

Mining records indicate the mine was last active in 1920, but it was used as a dump for sewerage in the 1960s and early 1970s, just before the disappearance of Terry.

“I’m feeling quite anxious at the moment,’’ Daryl said yesterday. “Terry’s disappearance has haunted my family for 35 years, now I want to get this over and done with. I want some closure.’’

On the day of Terry’s disappearance, two separate witnesses told police they saw a ''skinny, wiry’’ boy standing next to a white panel van on the Pyrenees Highway.

The last sighting was made by a man who was dumping animal offal into the bush. He told police he first saw a boy standing next to the vehicle at Bung Bong Hill about 4.55pm on June 28, 1975.

When he returned to the highway minutes later, the panel van was still on the roadside, but there was no sign of the boy.

Daryl’s love for his big brother has never waned. For months after his disappearance, the Floyds held out hope that Terry had run away and would be found safe and well.

But as those months turned into years, Daryl’s hope turned into despair and then anger as he realised that his big brother was probably dead and would never be coming home.

A 2001 coronial inquiry found Terry had likely died from unknown causes at an unknown place at an unknown time.

The 35-year search for Terry has taken its toll on the Floyd family. Daryl said the stress had contributed to the premature death of his mother, Dorothy. She died, aged 56, 12 years to the day after Terry disappeared. He said his remaining siblings were divided by the disappearance.

“Some of them are handling it very well, while others are still not coping and can’t even talk about it.”

Anyone who may have information about the disappearance of Terry Floyd is urged to contact Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000.

 

Mine search begins for boy's remains

Posted Mon Oct 18, 2010 1:16pm AEDT - ABC

Workers have excavated about 10 metres from a former mine shaft near Avoca, in central Victoria, in the search for the remains of a boy who went missing 35 years ago.

Terry Floyd, 12, was last seen on the Pyrenees Highway east of the town in 1975.

His brother Daryl believes the body is in the shaft and began excavation works on Saturday.

He estimates works will be finished within a fortnight and says workers have so far found animal bones and debris.

"A lot of buckets, it looks like from either a concrete or a painter has been coming out [and dumping debris], we have removed some animal remains at this stage, [Victoria Police] forensics are reviewing those bones which come from the shaft," he said.

Mr Floyd says work will resume next weekend and could finish within a fortnight.

"Very mixed feelings. You are very anxious, it's a hard feeling to describe. Wanting a result, hoping to get some sort of closure, that's what it's all about," he said.

Car parts found in old mine during search for body

KIM QUINLAN - The Courier
22 Oct, 2010 12:00 AM

 

A VEHICLE engine and other car parts found at a disused mine shaft at Avoca may hold the key to the disappearance of a 12-year-old Maryborough boy 35 years ago.

The four cylinder engine and what is believed to be a tail shaft, were found last weekend by a Maldon excavation crew searching for the remains of Terry Floyd, who disappeared from the outskirts of Avoca on June 28, 1975.

Homicide detectives confirmed yesterday that police were investigating the discovery on Sunday in the Morning Star gold mine, just off the Pyrenees Highway, and would try to trace the owner of the engine.

VicRoads data bases will be checked in an effort to trace the owner. As their computerised records only go back to 1982, police may have to sift through years of microfiche and hard copies to find the owner.

Convicted paedophile Raymond Kenneth Jones has long been a suspect in the murder, but denied any involvement when questioned by police.

Jones is believed to have been familiar with the area after spending part of his childhood there.

Terry's brother Daryl, who is funding the mine shaft excavation, said yesterday that he believed his own investigation was "heading in the right direction'', but he was not allowing himself to become over-confident.

After scrutinising the 254-page police brief and on receiving new information in recent months, Daryl believes the mine shaft, 500 metres from where Terry was last see, is the final resting place of his brother.

Daryl and the excavation crew will return to the mine shaft tomorrow.

The team has already dug 10 metres into the 20-metre gold mine. Anything of interest is recorded by a crime scene photographer, the pictures are then sent to Melbourne where they are examined by a pathologist. A detective is also on site during digging.

 

Missing Maryborough boy: mine search hits snag

KIM QUINLAN - The Courier
26 Oct, 2010 12:00 AM

 

THE brother of a Maryborough boy missing for 35 years is confident the search for the 12-year-old's remains in a disused Avoca gold mine could be finished by this Sunday.

Working only at weekends, a Maldon excavation crew has already dug

14 metres of the 20-metre mine shaft looking for the body of Terry James Floyd, who disappeared from the Pyrenees Highway on the outskirts of Avoca on June 28, 1975.

Terry's brother Daryl believes the body could be as far as 17 or 18 metres down the Morning Star mine, only 500 metres from where the Maryborough school boy was last seen.

Daryl, who is funding the search of the mine after receiving new information about his missing brother in recent months, said the excavation team was stalled last weekend by tree stumps and an old kitchen stove which had plugged the shaft.

Unable to use a standard chainsaw, the crew painstakingly cut up the huge pine stumps with an air saw.

"Getting the stove out of the shaft was another snag. Because of its sheer size and shape, it became jammed about four or five feet from the top. It was a big relief when it finally squeezed through the opening," Daryl said yesterday. "Barring any other snags, the mine could be fully excavated by the end of this weekend.''

Daryl said he was trying to keep an open mind about the search.

"(Police) have told me to live by the ABC method ... assume nothing, believe nothing, check everything," he said.

Anything of interest found in the mine shaft is recorded by a crime scene photographer, and the pictures are then examined by a pathologist. A detective is also on site during digging.

Hunt for brother's body costly

KIM QUINLAN - The Courier
13 Nov, 2010 12:00 AM

 

DARYL Floyd is almost financially ruined by the search for his brother, who has been missing for more than three decades.

The Rutherglen farmer has gone through his life savings to excavate a disused mine shaft near Avoca in the search for the body of Terry, who, at the age of 12, disappeared from alongside the Pyrenees Highway on June 28, 1975.

More than $20,000 has been spent since the search began six weeks ago following new information in the 35-year-old case. Daryl must find at least another $45,000 to pay the Maldon excavation crew when it finishes at the Bung Bong Hill site in coming days.

Daryl became convinced Terry's body was dumped down the mine shaft after he received new information several months ago.

While detectives have been on site at the mine since the search began, Daryl has not received any financial assistance from Victoria Police in an effort to find his brother's final resting place.

Victoria Police said there were no solid facts to support the belief that the body of Terry was in the mine, a police spokesman has said.

This was the reason Victoria Police decided not to fund the cost of the excavation.

However, the spokesman said the Terry Floyd case remained open and police were always prepared to act on new information and commit resources where appropriate.

 

Boy's shirt found in Avoca mine

KIM QUINLAN - The Courier
13 Nov, 2010 12:00 AM

 

A SHIRT believed to belong to missing Maryborough boy Terry Floyd has been found in a disused mine shaft near Avoca.

The red Miller's shirt was discovered by an excavation crew on Thursday after a six-week search of the former Morning Star gold mine at Bung Bong Hill.

The shirt, found in good condition about 25 metres down the shaft, is believed to have been worn by Terry the day he disappeared from along the Pyrenees Highway on June 28, 1975.

Terry's brother Daryl, who has been financing the excavation of the shaft, located only 500 metres from where his brother was last seen, was confident the children's sized shirt belonged to the missing 12-year-old.

"We were a poor family and so didn't have many clothes. Terry had two Miller's shirts, a blue one and a red one, and he was wearing one the day he disappeared," Daryl said yesterday from the search site.

"I was only 10 when Terry went missing and I can remember stories that Mum told at the time saying that he was wearing a Miller's shirt, but I can't remember which colour it was.

"I will be shattered if we don't find anything after the search, but the discovery of this shirt has lifted my hopes and makes me convinced that the information given to me about this particular mine shaft a few month ago was spot-on."

While Terry disappeared in the mid-1970s and the shirt was found among rubbish dating back to only the early 1980s, Daryl believes the item of clothing may have been snagged on the side of the shaft for some years before being dislodged. The shirt has been bagged ready for police examination.

Yesterday, the Maldon excavation crew reached the 25.2-metre mark of the shaft, but experts believe the mine could be as deep as 30 metres.

Daryl said the excavation crew, which initially worked at the site only at weekends, had spent eight hours each day since last Saturday down the mine removing tonnes of rubbish in the search for Terry's body.

"They go down at 9am, come back up for a break at 3pm, then go back down for another two hours. They need to work six hours straight because getting up an down the ladder, which goes down 25 metres at the moment, is just too hard," Daryl said.

Anything of interest found in the mine is recorded by a crime scene photographer and pictures are then sent to Melbourne where they are examined by a pathologist. A detective has also been on site during the digging.

No decision on funding help in mine search for missing boy

KIM QUINLAN - The Courier
17 Nov, 2010 12:00 AM

 

A DECISION is yet to be made on whether the state government or Victoria Police will help fund the excavation of an Avoca mine shaft in the search for a missing Maryborough boy.

A spokesman for Police Minister James Merlino said yesterday talks were continuing to find a funding solution for Daryl Floyd, who has spent his life savings in the search for his brother Terry, who, at the age of 12, disappeared 35 years ago.

The minister's spokesman said he did not want to see the project abandoned and would discuss its funding with Victoria Police Chief Commissioner Simon Overland.

This followed a plea at the weekend by Daryl for help to finance the search of the Morning Star gold mine at Bung Bong Hill. The full-scale excavation of the mine, which began early last month, has already cost $20,000, with another $45,000 needed to pay the Maldon mining crew leading the search.

Daryl is financing the mine excavation following new information in the case. The search has left the Rutherglen farmer financially ruined after he spent is life savings looking for his brother. He now fears the search may have to be abandoned if funding is not found.

While detectives have been on site at the mine since the search began, Daryl has not received any financial assistance from Victoria Police in an effort to find his brother's final resting place.

When the search began last month, a Victoria Police spokesman said there were no solid facts to support the belief that the body of Terry was in the mine. This was the reason Victoria Police decided not to fund the cost of the excavation.

Last Thursday a shirt believed to belong to Terry was found about 25 metres down the shaft.

The red Miller's shirt was in good condition and has been handed over to police for examination.

 

No clues on 35-year-old missing boy case

By Terry Rickard - ABC

Updated Tue Dec 7, 2010 1:15pm AEDT

Victoria Police say the excavation of a mine shaft has produced no new evidence about what happened to a missing 12-year-old boy 35 years ago.

Terry Floyd, from Maryborough in central Victoria, disappeared on his way home from the nearby town of Avoca on June 28, 1975.

He was last seen hitchhiking on the Pyrenees Highway.

The boy's body has never been found and police believe he was abducted and killed.

Last month Daryl Floyd, the missing boy's brother, started excavating an abandoned mine shaft near the place where he was last seen.

However Detective Inspector John Potter from the homicide squad says the excavation has not produced any answers.

"At this time there is no new evidence to link a suspect to Terry's disappearance," he said.

Police have issued a fresh appeal for information and have increased the $5,000 reward to $100,000.

But Daryl Floyd says the family is still seeking answers.

"For me and for the Floyd family we need to get some closure one way or the other," he said.

"That is finding out either whether Terry is there or not there. It puts our mind to rest."

 

Police issue fresh appeal, $100,000 reward for information over disappearance of schoolboy Terry Floyd

POLICE today appealed for public help to solve the 35-year mystery of what happened to missing schoolboy Terry Floyd.

Homicide squad Detective-Inspector John Potter said evidence suggested 12-year-old Terry was abducted and murdered.

Det-Insp Potter said he believed a $100,000 reward could help solve the mystery.

Terry disappeared while on his way home to Maryborough from nearby Avoca on June 28, 1975.

He was last seen hitchhiking on the Pyrenees Highway between Avoca and Maryborough.

Despite extensive investigations and searches spanning 35 years, Terry's body has never been found.

His brother Daryl Floyd is in the process of excavating a disused mine shaft near Avoca after circumstantial evidence suggested Terry's body might have been dumped down it.

Det-Insp Potter today appealed for anyone with information which could help solve the case to come forward.

"The $5000 reward previously on offer has been increased to $100,000 in the hope that someone can provide that key piece of information that will bring Terry's killer to justice and provide the Floyd family with closure,'' he said.

"We believe there is someone out there that knows what happened to Terry and after more than three decades his family deserves to finally lay him to rest.

"If anyone in the community knows where he is then we ask them to contact police.''

The Herald Sun revealed last month the search of the mine shaft was in danger of being abandoned as Daryl Floyd was running out of money to fund it.

That prompted Victoria Police to step in and agree to provide some funding.

"Victoria Police has decided to fund the majority of the excavation of the Morning Star mine shaft at Avoca in the search for suspected murder victim Terry Floyd's body,'' acting assistant commissioner Gerry Ryan told the Herald Sun in November.

"While there is no clear evidence to suggest that Terry's body was dumped in the mine shaft, we are committed to providing justice and closure for the Floyd family and want to ensure that all leads are followed up''.

Daryl Floyd today said he was determined to keep excavating the mine until the bottom of it was reached.

The Herald Sun revealed in September that new evidence implicated convicted paedophile Raymond Kenneth Jones in the abduction and killing of Terry.

Jones, 58, has been a suspect for years, but police have so far have been unable to get enough evidence to charge him with Terry's murder.

He recently told the Herald Sun he wasn't involved in Terry's disappearance and had nothing to fear from the new search for Terry's body.

Anyone with information is urged to contact Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000 or visit www.crimestoppers.com.au.

Avoca mine search for Terry Floyd continue

27 Mar, 2011 11:21 PM

SIX months after the search of an Avoca mine began for missing Maryborough boy Terry Floyd, his brother is still hopeful of finding his remains.

In October last year, Daryl Floyd and a team of mining experts began excavating the disused Morning Star gold mine at Bung Bong Hill in the painstaking search for the remains of Terry Floyd, who disappeared in 1975, aged 12.

After excavating to the 52-metre mark and removing more than 300 tonnes of rubbish, Mr Floyd is still determined to continue the search for his brother, who was last seen only 500 metres from the mine on June 28, 1975.

Excavation of the mine is expected to continue to at least the 100-metre mark.

Dating from rubbish currently being removed from the mine, Mr Floyd believes the search is at the early 1980s point. Terry disappeared from along the Pyrenees Highway on Saturday, June 28, 1975.

Detectives investigating the case believe Terry was abducted and murdered.

But while Mr Floyd is still hopeful of finding his brother’s remains in the disused mine, his financial resources to fund the search have dried up.

From this weekend, he and the search team will take a two-month break so Mr Floyd can save money to continue the excavation.

The $50,000 from Victoria Police to fund the search only covers half of what Mr Floyd has spent so far.

“Excavating the mine costs $1500-a-metre. Despite the $50,000 from Victoria Police, I’m still $50,000 out-of-pocket,” Mr Floyd said.

“I need to take a two-month break and get back to work to save some more money for the search. I’ve still got household bills coming in and I need to play catch-up, but I’m determined to keep going,” the security firm manager and horse trainer said yesterday.

While Mr Floyd pays for the professional mining crew, a team of volunteers travels to Avoca regularly to help in the search.

Several businesses, including Coates Hire, have also donated excavation equipment for the search.


 

Threat over hunt for boy's body

Excavation for missing Maryborough boy Terry Floyd to resume

11 Jul, 2011 12:19 AM - The Courier

THE search for a Maryborough boy believed murdered and dumped down a disused mine shaft in 1975 will resume next month.

Twelve-year-old Terry James Floyd vanished from the intersection of the Sunraysia and Pyrenees highways, near Avoca, on June 28, 1975.

His brother, Daryl Floyd, was 10 when Terry disappeared.

He has spent $50,000 on the excavation of an old gold mine shaft at Bung Bong Hill, 500 metres from where Terry was last seen.

Mr Floyd believes Terry’s body lies in the shaft, with new clues recovered in the dig, which started in October, convincing him the mystery is close to being solved.

“We’ve pulled some interesting stuff already and I’m sure we will keep finding some interesting parts when we start back up again in August,” Mr Floyd said. “I can’t be 100 per cent sure, but I am 99.8 per cent sure that this is where we will find Terry.”

Mr Floyd is confident a silver chain pulled from the shaft in November belonged to his brother.

The necklace was sent away to forensics, but due to the time period that has passed DNA testing proved inconclusive.

Mr Floyd has also refused to discount a red Miller’s shirt found in rubbish dating back to the early 1980s belonged to Terry.

“Terry had a red Miller’s shirt and a blue Miller’s shirt,” Mr Floyd said. “I’m under the belief that he had a blue Miller’s shirt on when he went missing and it was a red Miller’s shirt that we found, but that’s still not to discount it.”

Mr Floyd said work at the mine stopped in March to allow the miners to meet other commitments.

The break also allowed him to save money after funds for the excavation, which included a $50,000 contribution from Victoria Police, ran out at the 53-metre mark.

Mr Floyd thanked the many businesses and individuals who have donated their services, money and equipment.

“People all over have contributed in one way, shape or form,” Mr Floyd said. “For us, the main drive is to find Terry’s body and give him the burial and the respect he deserves.”

Victoria Police have offered a $100,000 reward to anyone who can help solve the mystery. Anyone with information can contact Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000 or visit www.crimestoppers.com.au

Mr Floyd said anyone who would like to donate towards the excavation could call him on 0402 125 551.

Terry Floyd went missing after starring in junior footy game

DESPITE only being 12, Terry Floyd was such a good footballer that he was a leading player in the Maryborough Rovers under-15 team.

He played a blinder for the Rovers on Saturday, June 28, 1975, and went missing later that day.

His younger brother Daryl Floyd, who was 10 when Terry disappeared, believes Terry was abducted and murdered within hours of the footy game finishing.

Mr Floyd also believes he now has a very good idea of how Terry spent his last day alive.

''I believe Terry had organised with one of the football club helpers, Frank Drake, who was known to the boys as Unc and who has since died, to give him a lift from Maryborough to Avoca straight after the game,'' he said.

''Terry had told a school friend on the Friday that he was going to Avoca the next day to check on why his girlfriend hadn't been at school that day.

''I believe what cost Terry his life was being 10 to 15 minutes late for his lift back home to Maryborough. Terry had told a friend that Unc was picking him up in Avoca at 4.30pm to take him home.

''We know it was about 4.45pm before Terry arrived at the junction of the Pyrenees and Sunraysia highways to be picked up.

''I presume Unc arrived as arranged at 4.30pm and when Terry didn't turn up he drove off without him.

''That left Terry stranded. He would have been scared that he would get into trouble for being late home so would have been willing to accept a lift.''

Evidence suggests Terry got into a white or fawn panel van that stopped as he stood by the side of the main road from Avoca to Maryborough.

He and Daryl Floyd spent the previous night sleeping at their grandmother's house, which was next door to the Floyd family home in Avoca Rd, Maryborough.

Mr Floyd said he saw Terry leave his grandmother's house at 8.30 the next morning to walk to nearby Jubilee Park to play football for the Rovers - and he never saw him again.

''Terry wasn't just my brother, he was my best mate,'' he said.

A necklace found snagged on a jutting rock 38 metres down the mine shaft being excavated on the suspicion Terry's body was dumped in it brought memories of his brother flooding back.

While Mr Floyd can't be sure the sterling silver necklace is the one Terry habitually wore, it certainly could be.

The necklace has been examined by a jeweller, who confirmed it was made about the time Terry disappeared in 1975.

''It was very personal to Terry because I can remember every time he played football he would always remove the necklace, put it in his front pocket, he would give it two or three taps to make sure it was there,'' Mr Floyd said.

''Terry, in the midst of fighting and wrestling, as you did as kids, if I happened to break that necklace on Terry I would cop a couple more thumps on the arm for doing that.

''I know Terry would have been wearing that necklace the day he disappeared.''

Collapsed mine halts Maryborough search

BRETT WORTHINGTON - Bendigo Advertiser
05 Apr, 2012 04:00 AM

 

A COLLAPSED mine shaft has halted the search for a missing Maryborough boy near Avoca.

The collapse came as miners uncovered thousands of cow heads thrown into the shaft in 1979, leaving four years of bones and other material to sort through before reaching the period schoolboy Terry Floyd disappeared.

Terry’s brother Daryl Floyd said the miners were reassessing how to get through the collapsed shaft and cow heads.

Mr Floyd said miners found the cow heads in a second shaft connected to the one they had been excavating.

“The shaft that the heads are in, it is behind the one we had been working in,” he said.

“What we are thinking is that shaft, the one behind us, might have been the original shaft that they used to use.

“It has got three feet of sewage.

“We have been down it, it has a 20-foot drop before you get to all the collapsed stuff. It is very unstable ground.” Terry disappeared more than 36 years ago, aged 12.

He had played football for Maryborough in the morning, visited a friend at Avoca in the afternoon and was last seen on the corner of the Pyrenees and Sunraysia highways.

Mr Floyd believes his brother’s remains are in the mine shaft.

He resumed the excavation earlier this year.

Mr Floyd and the miners returned to Morning Star mine at Bung Bong Hill, near Avoca, last week.

They discovered the heads and spent the remainder of the week plotting how they could get through the bones.

Mr Floyd said he hoped to open-cut the area above the new shaft and drill down to the area they needed to excavate.

He said he needed permission from authorities to open cut the land and drill into the shaft.