Celena BRIDGE

 

  

 

  Celena Bridge photo

 

See also Sabrina GLASSOP and Elizabeth HENRY

 

Celena BRIDGE

On 10 August 1998, Celena BRIDGE, 28 years, was reported missing to the Missing Persons Bureau, Brisbane by her fiance Jonathon WEBB, a British national holidaying in Australia. Ms BRIDGE had arrived in Australia on 6 May 1998 and intended to meet Mr WEBB on his arrival to continue their holiday together. When she failed to meet him Mr WEBB became concerned and reported the matter to police. The last positive sighting of Ms BRIDGE was on 16 July 1998 on Booloumba Creek Road at Conondale. Her bank account was last accessed in Brisbane on 13 July 1998. Ms BRIDGE is described as 165 cm tall, of slim build, tanned complexion, with brown hair and green eyes. Any member of the public with information which could assist Police is asked to contact the Homicide Investigation Group, Brisbane, Phone (07) 3364 6122 or Crime Stoppers, Phone 1800 333 000

 


*Account from UK BBC news network August 17, 1998 - The parents of a British backpacker who went missing in Australia say they have given up hope of finding her alive. Lionel and Beth Bridge, from Carlisle, arrived in Australia on Sunday to join the police search for their 28-year-old daughter Celena. A keen bushwalker and environmentalist, Ms Bridge went missing over a month ago in a south-east Queensland state forest. She was on a three-month tour of Australia studying birds and eco-systems. Police now believe the woman may have been hurt in an accident in the state forest. They said there were no indications of foul play.* The young woman was last seen on 12 July when she left Crystal Waters, about 45 miles north-west of Brisbane, for a birdwatchers' meeting the following weekend. She failed to turn up for the meeting in Kenilworth, 60 miles away. The alarm was raised when Ms Bridge failed to meet her fiance Jonathan Webb at Brisbane airport when he arrived from the UK to join her on holiday. Her father Lionel told reporters: "We think the most likely thing that has happened is that she's had an accident ... but there is always the possibility in the back of our minds that something else has happened." Ms Bridge's parents do not expect to see their daughter alive. "We have no hope - it's a terrible thing to say but we've got to be realistic," her father said.

Editor's note - *This is inaccurate, QLD Police do believe Celena was murdered and there is a reward for information about her disappearance


Search of forest, Bridge and Glassop suspected murders, Kenilworth

QLD Police and State Emergency Services Volunteers will search forest near Kenilworth on Saturday following new leads into the suspected murders of two women in 1998 and 1999 on the north coast.

Police and State Emergency Services Volunteers will search forest near Kenilworth on Saturday following new leads into the suspected murders of two women in 1998 and 1999 on the north coast.

The two women, Celena Bridge, 28, a British tourist and local resident Sabrina Ann Glassop, 46 of Kenilworth both disappeared in the Kenilworth area 10 months apart.

Celena Bridge, who was holidaying in Australia, was last seen on July 16, 1998 on the Booloumba Creek Road, Connondale.

Sabrina Ann Glassop, 46, was last seen on the evening of May 29, 1999 at her home in Booloumba Creek Road, Kenilworth. Her parents reported hearing her car leave the property the next morning about 6.00am and drive in the direction of Kenilworth. A search of the area located her car in the Little Yabba Creek carpark.

Following new leads police are coordinating the first of a number of searches of the Brooloo forest which is located between Imbil and Kenilworth. Saturday’s search will comprise police from the local area, officers from the Homicide Squad, officers from the Police Dog Squad with cadaver dogs and 80 State Emergency Services volunteers.

A $250,000 reward is offered in each case for information which leads to the apprehension and conviction of the person or persons responsible for the disappearance and suspected murders of Ms Bridge and Ms Glassop.

Media interested in obtaining vision can meet at the State Emergency Services Headquarters in Yabba Street, Imbil at 8.00am. The search will be conducted in areas of the forest 10-15 kilometres from Imbil and is only accessible by 4WD.

Detective Senior Sergeant Marc Bailey from the Homicide Investigation Unit, State Crime Operations Command will be available to speak with media following the 8am briefing.

Anyone with information about the incident is asked to contact Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000.
Last updated 27/04/2007

Cold case search fails to solve bush mystery
April 29, 2007 05:51pm Article from: AAP

A SEARCH through thick bush on Queensland's Sunshine Coast has failed to uncover any clues in the 10-year-old mystery behind the disappearance of two women from the area.

About 50 police and State Emergency Service (SES) volunteers yesterday used machetes and shovels to cut their way through thick bush at Brooloo Forest, between Imbil and Kenilworth, on the Sunshine Coast hinterland.

They were searching for fresh evidence after homicide detectives reopened the cold case files of British backpacker Celena Bridge and local teachers' aid, Sabrina Ann Glassop.

Ms Bridge, 28, who was bushwalking in the area, was last seen on July 16, 1998 on the Booloumba Creek Road, Conondale.

Ms Glassop, 46, was last seen on the evening of May 29, 1999 at her Kenilworth home.

Her car was later found abandoned in a nearby country picnic area.

Yesterday's search found no new evidence, police said today, and the effort was not resumed.

Further searches would be conducted in the region in the coming weeks, police said.

Search fails to find clues
Article from: April 30, 2007 12:00am

A SEARCH through thick bush on the Sunshine Coast has failed to uncover any clues in the 10-year-old mystery behind the disappearance of two women from the area.

About 50 police and State Emergency Service volunteers on Saturday used machetes and shovels to cut their way through thick bush at Brooloo Forest, between Imbil and Kenilworth, in the Sunshine Coast hinterland.
They were searching for fresh evidence after homicide detectives re-opened the cold case files of British backpacker Celena Bridge and local teachers' aide, Sabrina Ann Glassop.

Bridge, 28, who was bushwalking in the area, was last seen on July 16, 1998 on the Booloumba Creek Rd, Conondale.

Glassop, 46, was last seen on the evening of May 29, 1999, at her Kenilworth home. Her car was later found abandoned in a nearby country picnic area.

But the weekend search did not find any new evidence, police said yesterday, although there would be further searches in the region in the next few weeks.

A team of investigators was sent to Victoria and NSW to interview people of interest in the case.

Detective Senior-Sergeant Marc Bailey, of Brisbane's Homicide Investigation Unit, did not say what led police to search the area.

But cadaver dogs were used to comb the isolated area.

Anyone with information is asked to contact CrimeStoppers on 1800 333 000.

Search fails to find murder clues
16.06.2007 - Sunshine Coast Daily

A search today of forest near Kenilworth did not uncover anything of significance relating to the suspected murders of two women on the Sunshine Coast in 1998 and 1999.
Police said it appeared the area searched has previously been used to dispose of animal remains.

Police and State Emergency Service Volunteers conducted the search but did not find any human remains.

This search followed on from new information and comprised local police, Homicide Squad, Police Dog Squad and cadaver dogs and 80 State Emergency Service volunteers.

Police intend to conduct further searches in the near future.

Celena Bridge, 28, a British tourist, and Sabrina Ann Glassop, 46, of Kenilworth, both disappeared in the Kenilworth area 10 months apart.
Celena Bridge, who was holidaying in Australia, was last seen on July 16, 1998 on the Booloumba Creek Road, Connondale.

Sabrina Ann Glassop, 46, was last seen on the evening of May 29, 1999 at her home in Booloumba Creek Road, Kenilworth.

Clothes spark new hunt
Article from: Lou Robson - Courier Mail
June 17, 2007 12:00am

CLOTHING found in bushland west of the Sunshine Coast could be linked to the disappearance of two women more than eight years ago.

Police yesterday revealed that women's clothing had been found in the Imbil State Forest, 25km north of Kenilworth, where British tourist Celena Bridge, 28, and teacher's aide Sabrina Ann Glassop, 46, went missing between July 1998 and May 1999.
Detective Senior Sergeant Marc Bailey said the clothes were found beside a dirt road.

Animal bones were also found in the area, on the outskirts of the forest.

It is believed local farmers who butcher their own meat discard bones in a gully near where the clothes were found.

"Forensic tests confirmed the clothing is women's clothing but we do not know if the items belonged to the missing women," Det Sen-Sgt Bailey said.

"Bones found nearby also underwent forensic examination and were not human."

Police refused to describe the items. Det Sen-Sgt Bailey said a Brisbane documentary-maker investigating the disappearance of Sunshine Coast teenager Daniel Morcombe found the clothing in 2005.

The badly decayed items were initially examined to see if they were Daniel's. They were re-examined recently at the John Tonge Centre in Brisbane and identified as women's clothes.

The re-examination of the clothes prompted a search of the region yesterday. State Emergency Service volunteers combed 1ha of forest near where the clothes were found.

The search follows the examination on April 29 of 4000sq m of forest at Brooloo, 5km north of Kenilworth.

Three suspect mounds of earth were found during the search but were later ruled out of the investigation.

In 2002, Maroochydore coroner Paul Johnstone found the missing women were dead "having met with foul play".

Anyone with information should contact Crimestoppers on 1800 333 000.

Kenilworth cold cases still not closed, police say

Posted Sun Apr 29, 2007 9:49am AEST
Updated Mon Apr 30, 2007 11:21am AEST  - ABC

Queensland police say investigations into two unsolved suspected murder cases on the Sunshine Coast will continue.

British backpacker Celena Bridge, 28, disappeared in the Kenilworth area in 1998 and 10 months later local woman Sabrina Ann Glassop, 46, vanished in the same area.

Acting on new leads, police and State Emergency Service (SES) crews yesterday searched bushland in a Kenilworth forest.

Detective Senior Sergeant Marc Bailey says there will be more searches in the future.

"To this stage nothing's been turned up but we do have to go over a couple of other areas at a later date with scientific officers," he said.

"As you can appreciate, we were just acting on information that we had received and as result we had to go to that area so it wasn't a case of specifically looking for anything, it was a case of looking for anything and everything."

He says the police will not give up on the case.

"Sometimes the public perceive that we close cases but I can assure the public now that no case that has never been closed is ever closed, it always remains open," he said.

"That's the case with this one - it's been reviewed and as result further investigations are being conducted."

Behind one of the Coast's biggest mysteries
28.04.2007
BACKGROUNDER by Janine Hill Ballina Shire Advocate

WHEN British backpacker Celena Bridge began a hike in the Sunshine Coast hinterland on a winter's day in 1998, she walked into a mystery that would envelope two more women and intrigue Australia for the next seven years.

Ms Bridge was the first of three women to go missing on the Coast in a 16 month period. All of them are now assumed to be dead.

Each was linked in some way to a man named Derek Bellington Sam, although he has only ever been charged and convicted of one murder, that of teenager Jessica Gaudie - the last of the three to disappear.

Finding the missing women, or their bodies, has been like looking for a needle in a haystack for police - without knowing exactly where to find even the haystack.

In all three cases detectives have been frustrated tracing the women's final hours, with either no, or hazy, reported sightings to follow up to help pinpoint a location.
Extensive searches in the Kenilworth area, which involved police camping out overnight in rough terrain and climbing into ravines, failed to turn up anything.

Detective Superintendent Mike Condon, of the Brisbane Homicide Squad, said there were many deep mine shafts in the area that were too dangerous to be searched.

Ms Bridge could have met her fate up to 25 days before anyone realised something was wrong.

The 28-year-old environmental science graduate was in Australia on a backpacking trip to study ecosystems and birdlife when she disappeared.

She had stayed two nights at a "commune'' in the Sunshine Coast hinterland, the Crystal Waters permaculture village at Conondale, before she set off on July 16 to walk to the Little Yabba Creek camping ground at Kenilworth for a bird- watching meeting the following weekend.

She never arrived.

However, it was not until August 10, when she failed to meet her boyfriend, Johnathon Webb, when he flew over from England to join her that anyone realised she was missing.

Searches of the area failed to find any trace of Ms Bridge or her backpack.

Ms Bridge was seen about 3.30pm on July 16 by a resident of Booloumba Creek Road, and also that afternoon by two men who worked with Derek Sam at Piabun, a centre for troubled Aboriginal youths, on the same road.

However, unlike his boss Mark Johnson and workmates John Poole and Geoff Turner, who identified the person they saw as Ms Bridge, Sam told a 2002 coronial inquest he could not identify the person he saw as male or female, let alone as Celena Bridge.

That same inquiry also looked into the disappearances of Sabrina Ann Glassop and Jessica Gaudie. Ms Glassop was known to Sam and the two were rumoured by some to have been having an affair.

The 47-year-old teacher aid, who lived on the same road as Ms Bridge was last seen, and the same road as the Piabun centre where Derek Sam worked, disappeared on May 29, 1999.

Her car was found at the Little Yabba Creek rest area, just a few hundred metres from her home, where she is believed to have taken her poodle, Poppy, for a walk.

She had dined with her husband, Eric, the night before. He lived in the Kenilworth Forestry office and they made arrangements that he would return the next morning with newspapers and fresh bread for breakfast.

The next morning, Ms Glassop's mother, Joan Worsley, who lived with her husband in a caravan behind her daughter's house, heard her car leave about 6am or 6.30am.

Mrs Worsley became concerned when her daughter failed to return, leaving the animals unfed and the gate open. Eric was also concerned when he arrived for breakfast.

On his way back to the office, he spotted her car. He stopped and noticed it was locked and the bonnet slightly warm.

As with Ms Bridge, searches for Ann Glassop turned up nothing.

Sam's Piabun colleague, John Poole, later told an inquest that Sam had made lewd comments about Ms Glassop and boasted of doing some work at a teacher's house and having a date with one.

Mr Poole told the inquest that a few days after Ms Glassop's disappearance, Sam had acted strangely during a horse ride, taking different routes through the bush, and avoiding an area known as Spike's Hut.

Jessica Gaudie went missing almost three months to the day after Ms Glassop disappeared. However, she was almost instantly linked with Derek Sam, who was later convicted of her murder.

Jessica was never seen by her family after she left home on August 28 to babysit three young children, for Derek Sam's estranged de facto, Mia Summers, who lived a short distance away in Ridgewood Street, Burnside, and wanted to go to a birthday party that evening.

That night, Sam turned up at the same party and was involved in an argument with another man over Mia. He told police he went back to Mia Summers' house and picked up Jessica to ask her to go into the party and get Mia to come home.

He claimed he had dropped Jessica off at the intersection of Bonney and Elizabeth streets, Nambour.

 

Missing women mystery revived

DETECTIVES are preparing to put the disappearance of three women on the Sunshine Coast in the late 1990s back on the agenda.

British backpacker Celena Bridge, 28, was the first of the three to go missing in a 16-month period. Sabrina Ann Glassop, 46, was the second and Jessica Gaudie, 16, the third.

Their bodies have never been found but police have long believed all three disappeared at the hands of Kenilworth-based indigenous tracker Derek Bellington Sam, 38.

The three women were all linked in some way to Sam, who is serving jail time for the murder of Jessica.

Sunshine Coast detective Daren Edwards, a cold case specialist who became the Criminal Investigation Bureau chief earlier this year, had promised to pursue the disappearances to give the women's families answers.

But the Daniel Morcombe investigation took precedence after an arrest in August and resources were allocated to an extensive search near the Glasshouse Mountains.

This week Snr Sgt Edwards said he would pursue the investigation with renewed vigour in the new year.

"We're in the process of getting all the original files from Homicide to have a proper read," he said.

"We want to refresh our minds, do a review of everything and find out where everyone is.

"But right now we're trying to tidy up the Major Incident Room here (which has been the heart of the Morcombe investigation) to make it more user friendly. Our aim is to take a new direction on this investigation with fresh eyes."

Missing Women

Police set to reopen inquiry into Cumbrian backpacker missing in Australian outback

By Nick Griffiths Crime Reporter - News & Star

Last updated at 12:16, Thursday, 01 December 2011
 

Detectives are poised to look again at the case of a missing Cumbrian backpacker who vanished in the Australian outback.

Officers say they want to look at the inquiry with fresh eyes – more than 13 years after Celena Bridge disappeared during a holiday Down Under.

Miss Bridge lived at Ainstable in the Eden Valley and was 28 when she went missing in 1998.

An investigation was launched after the conservation worker failed to meet her partner, Jonathan Webb, at Brisbane Airport.

She was last seen in the town of Conondale in Queensland after apparently setting off for a bird-watchers’ meeting.

Miss Bridge was described as easy-going and friendly. She was also an experienced hiker.

In July it was revealed a new police chief on the Sunshine Coast planned to look again at the case, but another investigation reportedly took precedence in the following months.

However, officers are now preparing to pursue with renewed vigour the cases of Miss Bridge and two other missing people, another woman and a teenage girl.

They all vanished in a 16-month period. Their bodies have never been found.

Senior Sergeant Daren Edwards told Australian newspaper the Sunshine Coast Daily: “We’re in the process of getting all the original files from homicide to have a proper read.

“We want to refresh our minds, do a review of everything. Our aim is to take a new direction on this investigation with fresh eyes.”

Miss Bridge’s fiancee reported her missing after the environmental science graduate failed to meet him when he arrived in Australia to join her.

It was initially thought she had died in an accident in the bush but murder was later suspected. It is reported in Australia that police have long believed all three missing people disappeared at the hands of a man now in jail for the murder of the teenager who vanished.

Families of Jessica Gaudie, Celena Bridge, Sabrina Glassop appeal for new focus on unsolved cases after Morcombe investigation ends

By Kristina Harazim - ABC

Updated Fri 21 Mar 2014, 9:15pm AEDT

The families of three murder victims on Queensland's Sunshine Coast hope the unsolved cases will get more focus now Daniel Morcombe's killer has been jailed.

Before the Queensland teenager's abduction and murder in 2003, two women and another teenager disappeared from the Sunshine Coast.

Brett Peter Cowan was jailed for Daniel's murder after detectives spent a decade on the investigation.

Five years before Daniel was abducted, the first of two women, Celena Bridge, and teenager Jessica Gaudie vanished without a trace.

Derek Sam is behind bars for killing 15-year-old Jessica, but her body has never been found.

If people keep saying her name then police might try harder ... it just worked for the Morcombes so I thought it might work for me.
Sister Tammy Gaudie

 

Kenilworth teacher's aide Sabrina Glassop, better known as Anne, disappeared in 1999.

Police have always suspected their bodies are in the forest around the hinterland town of Kenilworth, but searches have turned up nothing.

Sam is also a person of interest in the disappearance and suspected murders of the two women.

With the Morcombe case closed, the affected families are appealing to police to make finding their relatives a priority.

Only one family knows for sure their loved one was murdered, but they are still waiting for closure.

7.30 Queensland has spoken exclusively with two of the families who are desperate for police to shine a light on their cases.

Families hope investigations will 'step up a little bit'

Kelly Dodd last saw her younger sister Jessica Gaudie in August 1999.

"I'm hoping that they will continue on and maybe step it up a little bit and do some searches," Ms Dodd said.

"She was just starting to do her own thing and have a boyfriend."

The 15-year-old was babysitting children in Nambour when she was murdered by the children's father.

Sam claims he picked her up from the house and dropped her at a party he had been to earlier that night. However, she never showed up.

A jury found him guilty of murder and he was jailed for life, but Jessica's body was never found.

Her sister, Tammy Gaudie, says it leaves an "empty, sick feeling".

"My sister's not the kind of girl to sit there and take something that's happening, and I think she tried to fight back and he took it out on her," she said.

Jessica's mother Pauline Gaudie says the family needs to know what happened.

"If I knew where she was, that would probably give us closure," she said.

Two women vanish on Sunshine Coast

British tourist Ms Bridge, 28, was the first of the three to vanish.

Ms Bridge was last seen walking along Booloumba Creek Road at Kenilworth in July 1998.

She was hiking to the nearby Little Yabba Creek camping ground.

Ms Glassop was the next to disappear. Her car was found parked at Little Yabba Creek, a short distance from her home, in May 1999.

Neither she nor her pet poodle were seen again.

Ms Glassop's son Jed Moore says she was an "incredibly loving, caring and giving person".

"Not having any closure, not having any idea of how, why or where she died - that's the hardest part," he said.

Police and State Emergency Service officers combed large areas of forestry for any evidence several times, with the last search in 2007.

The case was reopened in July 2012 when police received new information, but as yet no-one has been charged and the bodies are still missing.

Coronial inquest names Sam as person of interest

A coronial inquest named Sam as a person of interest in both women's disappearances.

The experienced horseman and tracker worked with troubled youth in the area of Kenilworth, but there was not enough evidence to charge him.

Mr Moore says he suspects Sam killed his mother, Anne Glassop.

His grandmother Joan Worsley, who kept the case in the public eye, died last year.

"One of the biggest regrets for her was to go without knowing what'd happened to mum," Mr Moore said.

Like Mr Moore, Tammy Gaudie has avoided the media spotlight, trusting that police would solve the mystery.

But she is worried her mother will also die not knowing where her daughter is.

"I have more time so I can keep fighting for them but she's not going to have much more time," she said.

Not having any closure, not having any you know idea of how, why or where she died - that's the hardest part.
Anne Glassop's son, Jed Moore

 

She recently created a Facebook page devoted to finding her sister's remains.

"If people keep saying her name then police might try harder - I'm not sure," she said.

"It just worked for the Morcombes so I thought it might work for me."

It is difficult for Pauline Gaudie to hear Daniel's name.

"It just makes me think that they were just focussed on just the one person all the time," she said.

Families want police to make cases a priority

With Sam eligible for parole next year and the Morcombe case closed, Pauline Gaudie and her family want police to make finding Jessica's body a priority.

"I know they've got a lot of cases out there but we've been shoved with the rest of them," she said.

Pauline Gaudie is urging people to come forward with information.

"You're not going to get in trouble over it," she said.

Kelly Dodd is hopeful more can be done now that Daniel's case is finished.

"That would be really, really great if they could do as much for our family as they've done for the Morcombe family," she said.

Like the Morcombe case, Mr Moore hopes police are doing more than he is aware of.

"There's hope that comes to me through understanding the way the police have handled that matter," he said.

"That a similar level of resources would be applied to mum's case, and also Celena and Jessica's."

The families all want, and need, the same thing - closure.

They all believe someone, somewhere, knows something that could bring the investigations to an end.

"Closure, the ability to say goodbye and to have somewhere that we can go and pay our respects and be in touch," Mr Moore said.

Kelly Dodd adds: "I don't like the idea of her being out somewhere alone - that is quite hard to deal with."

7.30 Queensland requested an interview with police or a statement about the cases, but the request was declined.