William TYRELL

 

Name: TYRELL William Sex: Male
Year of Birth: 2011 Age 2014: 3

 
At Time of Disappearance
Age: 3 Height (cm): 93.0 Build: Medium
Hair Colour: Brown Eye Colour: Brown Complexion: Medium
Nationality:   Racial Appearance: Caucasian    

 
Circumstances
William was last seen at Kendall NSW on 12 September 2014

Search underway for missing three-year-old boy at Kendall

Updated - ABC

A large search involving police and SES crews is continuing on the state's mid-north coast for a missing three-year-old boy.

William Tyrell was last seen at half-past ten this morning in the front yard of his home in Kendall, south of Port Macquarie.

He is described as caucasian, with dark hair and hazel eyes and was wearing a Spiderman costume.

The police helicopter was called in earlier today to assist in the search, but there have been no sightings of the young boy so far.

The boy's home is located near bushland on Benaroon Drive, on the outskirts of the rural village.

Three-year-old boy goes missing from front yard in Kendall on NSW Mid North Coast

A desperate search is underway for a three-year-old Sydney boy wearing a Spider-Man suit who has gone mising from a home on the NSW mid north coast.

The boy vanished from the front yard of a relative’s home in Benaroon Drive, Kendall just after 10.30am.

Polair, the NSW dog squad, the local State emergency services and scores of local police have converged on the remote property surrounded by bushland.

Police have established a mobile command outside the property where he is missing from about 35km south of Port Macquarie.

The boy was last seen playing in his costume in the front yard.

Police have been inundated with support from locals who want to join the search.

more than 50 officers from the Mid North Coast Local Area Command, SES units from Port Macquarie, Wauchope and the Camden Haven, the Dog Squad and concerned residents have established a search grid in nearby scrub.

The home is not far from the Kendall State Forest.

Police described the boy as being Caucasian with dark hair and hazel eyes.

Police have asked the public to remain clear of the area so the search team can conduct a thorough sweep of the area.

PolAir is expected to arrive this afternoon.

Anyone with information about his location has been urged to contact Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000 or visit the Crime Stoppers online reporting page.

 

William Tyrell: Three-year-old boy wearing Spider-Man costume missing at Kendall, on New South Wales mid-north coast, search continues

Updated - ABC

A large search is continuing for a three-year-old boy wearing a Spider-Man costume who went missing from the front lawn of a house on the New South Wales mid-north coast.

William Tyrell was last seen around 10:30am (AEST) on Friday outside a relative's home at Kendall, south of Port Macquarie.

Superintendent Paul Fehon said the boy disappeared during a five minute window while playing outside.

"At the time he was playing with a sister and unfortunately in the space of five minutes he's disappeared from sight," he said.

State Emergency Services volunteers and police spent Friday and Saturday searching nearby bushland but were unable to find the boy.

SES duty officer Jason Sims said extra volunteers from nearby towns and the Hunter Valley were called in for a more extensive search.

PolAir, mounted police, officers on trail bikes and volunteers from community groups like the local surf lifesaving club and Rural Fire Service are all involved.

"They have adequate resources at this point in time at the location," Mr Sims said.

"They will stop fielding requests for people to come and assist at this point until such time as they may need more people later on down the track.

"They've got about 200 people there assisting, 100 of which are trained for that type of searching.

"The search will continue in bushland around the young boy's home.

"He was last [seen] wearing the Spider-Man suit, so please keep an eye out for that."

The boy has dark hair and hazel eyes.

Mr Sims said weather conditions were mild overnight and may have helped the boy survive a night in the bush.

"I'm not sure what the temperature got down to but from reports I have ... conditions were favourable," he said.

"We have all hopes out that the young boy, if he's still in the bush there, will not have to worry too much about the weather conditions."

Inspector Kim Fehon said they have gone back over the same areas that were searched yesterday in case they missed anything.

"The child is three years old and very small," she said.

"There is a possibility the child may have curled up and be very small so we want to make sure we haven't missed [him]."

"[The family], they're keeping it together, they're assisting police.

"The father's been out all day yesterday and from first light this morning searching so they're just hoping we find him safe and sound."

Community offers support

Local resident Peter Alley has been out searching cow paddocks and hilly terrain for the missing toddler.

He does not know the family but said he can imagine what would be going through their minds.

"I've got children myself and I know how I would feel if I had a lost three-year-old," he said.

"I can only start to imagine how a three-year-old would be feeling.

"I feel for young William and I certainly feel for his parents and his grandparents and that's why there are so many people from the community that are out here today."

Local pony club riders joined mounted police when they heard that the three-year-old was missing.

"It's rough terrain out there, scratches everywhere but we just wanted to get out there and help," said Brooke Atkins, who is a member of the Camden Haven pony club.

"We pushed the horses through the bush ... it's very thick.

"[We feel] so sad because we all have family members the same age, so we can relate."

 

William Tyrell: Police ramp up efforts to find missing 3yo boy in Spider-Man costume

By Kylie Simmonds

Updated - ABC

Searchers looking for a missing three-year-old boy on the mid-north coast of New South Wales have re-traced their original steps, to double-check the boy has not been missed close to home.

William Tyrell, dressed in a Spider-Man costume, was playing with his sister outside his grandmother's house at Kendall, south of Port Macquarie, when he went missing on Friday morning.

Superintendent Paul Fehon said the third day of the search saw crews go back over the original search area.

"Our search has gone back to the original location where young William was last seen, and we have retraced approximately one to one-and-a-half square kilometres quite thoroughly," he said.

Police said they would continue to search through the night for the child.

Earlier, Inspector Kim Fehon briefed rescue teams and said they still believed the boy was within a 1.5 kilometre radius of the house.

"We need to make sure we have covered every blade of grass within that area," she told crews.

Inspector Fehon said the search was in a critical phase.

"We're now in the third full day of the search for a three-year-old boy who has had no food and unless he's found water, no water, so it is likely that he has in a poor state of health and we need to find him today," she said.

"We have sought expert medical advice from a doctor who has provided advice on many previous searches with success.

"He has advised us of course the three-year-old is very small and that by today he is likely to be still and tucked up tight."

PolAir remained on standby after searching the area for the past two days while sniffer dogs also covered the area.

Police divers also searched dams in the area.

"All swimming pools were searched on the first day that were visible from the air, so we're confident that we've covered all of those," Inspector Fehon said.

Voices calling out 'William' echo in the bush

The community rallied around the Tyrell family with hundreds calling out "William" as they searched dense bush.

Jodie Kelly said she had to come and help.

"I've got two kids and I'd be so devastated to know that my little boy was in this situation," she said.

"We're all out here to help the family. [It's very dense] about a metre and a half high of grass, like he could be anywhere."

Noleen Campbell and her family have been out looking through the bush twice now.

"I'm out here today because I'm a parent and I'd hate to think that my child was out there and I would wish every single person out in the world would come and help me," she said.

"[William would] be terribly frightened and that's why we're all here today ... it's so important to get out here and help."

Ms Campbell said the Tyrell family had their support.

"I think they probably feel a lot of guilt and they shouldn't feel any guilt at all because we are all parents and things happen and people shouldn't be judging them," she said.

Missing child is asthmatic, residents say

Local resident Brad Hinder spent the past two nights looking for the child who they believe suffers from asthma.

"We came out just to hope we could hear him crying in the quiet of the night ... but no sound," he said.

"He is most likely in this forest ... it's more thick in there - up to your chest ... a child can easily hide if he's had an asthma attack and gone down or even gone into shock.

"He could have got lost and panicked and gone into shock. It's the only reason you can imagine that he would sit down and be so silent.

"It's treacherous, you couldn't get much worse bush for a young three-year-old."

William Tyrell: 300 people join search for missing boy in Spider-Man costume

Updated - ABC

Up to 300 people are now involved in the search for a three-year-old New South Wales boy who has been missing for nearly four days.

Extra resources from around the state have been sent to Kendall, south of Port Macquarie on the NSW mid-north coast, as the search for William Tyrell continues.

The boy was wearing a Spider-Man costume when he disappeared from the balcony of his grandmother's house on Friday morning. He was last seen playing with his sister.

State Emergency Service (SES) volunteers, police and members of the local community have spent the past three days searching for him, and rescue teams spent Sunday night combing bushland calling out his name.

Police have said they could not rule out the possibility he was abducted.

Police divers have searched dams and waterways, and trail-bikes and horses have spent hours searching scrub near the house where he disappeared from.

Superintendent Paul Fehon from the Mid North Coast Command said on Monday morning they had hoped to have found William by now.

"With any situation like this, we do have an investigative capability and that capability is conducting inquires in regards to possible ... any other aspects of where young William may be," he said.

"We're openly minded at this stage to anything, but as time passes, that window does diminish.

"At this stage we've still got the window of opportunity for survival. Whilst we have that we're gearing up to continue to search."

Tyrell family expresses gratitude

William's family has expressed how grateful they are for the community's support.

"The family are very distraught and upset but they do wish to pass on their gratitude to all the volunteers and also the emergency services that have been here especially over the weekend," Superintendent Fehon said.

"We saw a wonderful rally of community support to be out there and to search for young William and they've shown their gratitude or expressed their gratitude in respect of that community rally."

Family friend Nicole spoke to the media on behalf of the Tyrells.

"The family are devastated, and they just desperately want William home," she said.

"William is a much loved and cherished little boy.

"If anyone out there has seen this little boy, knows anything about William, where he is, we just urge you please to contact the police.

"The family want to extend a heartfelt thankyou to all of the police, the SES, every volunteer, every community member that has come together over the last few days to help with the search."

Police have also urged anyone with information about William's whereabouts to contact them.

Superintendent Fehon said search crews would today be going back over the area close to the grandmother's home.

"We've covered in excess of 10 square kilometres and that's predominately due to the large amount of volunteers that have come forward from the community," he said.

"It's been quite amazing to see how much support there has been to try and locate this young boy.

"We're moving towards an area most probably between one to one-and-a-half kilometres from the last known location where he was seen.

"We've got new relief crews coming up from as far as Sydney this morning so we'll be starting with fresh eyes."

"At this stage we've still got the window of opportunity for survival. Whilst we have that we're gearing up to continue to search"

Anything is possible: searchers

Local residents armed with torches spent the night searching for the boy.

"We've searched the drains on the road, but there was nothing there," said one woman who was with a group of friends.

The group then searched a nearby abandoned home after one of them heard noises.

"[A] neighbour used to live in this house but she's now in a nursing home so it's been abandoned for a while," she said.

"You know, anything's possible."

Among those involved in the search is Jake Casser, a tracker who lives on the NSW Central Coast.

"I feel like it's my responsibility with the knowledge that I've got to come and look for this young fella in particular. My heart really goes out to the family," he said.

"I've got a young daughter, 11 month old daughter and I sort of put myself in the shoes of the family.

"(I) thought if there was someone out there that had skills like I've got, it'd be really wrong of me to not even take time of work and come out here and make sure that I try and look for this young fella."

 

William Tyrell: No leads in search for 3yo boy in Spider-Man suit

By Lucy Carter and staff

Updated - ABC

Police say they have not been able to come up with any leads after five days of searching for three-year-old William Tyrell, who disappeared near his grandmother's home on the NSW mid north coast.

However, Police Superintendent Paul Fehon said emergency services and volunteers would continue with their search as long as there was some hope of finding him.

"Unfortunately we're disappointed we've been unable to come up with any lead at this point in time," he said.

"But we will continue with those resources into tomorrow and as long as there's any chance of us finding out anything to do with young William's disappearance we will continue looking."

The search for the young boy was yesterday expanded to three kilometres around the spot where he was last seen five days ago.

William vanished on Friday while playing in a Spider-Man suit on the balcony of his grandmother's home at Kendall.

State Emergency Service (SES) volunteers, police and members of the local community have been combing nearby bushland since his disappearance.

It is believed he wandered into thick bushland while playing at his grandmother's house.

When did he go missing?

What does he look like?

What has the search entailed?

Was he abducted?

Investigators yesterday revisited ground already covered in the search in an effort to find him.

"Our investigative teams have been bolstered. We have 30 investigators out there working," Superintendent Fehon said.

"They will be conducting canvasses of the areas and they will be following up on any information that has been provided to us."

He said police were following up any possible sighting of William.

Family friend Nicole said the boy's family just wanted him back.

"The family [is] grateful that the police are looking at everything that will help to bring him back," she said.

"There's extra photos out there now of William and they just want people everywhere to see his face, to know what he looks like and to just say and tell the police anything that they might know or any slightest bit of information that they have if they've seen him."

Police hold out hope for survival in bush

Superintendent Fehon said the search had not yet become a recovery operation despite the boy having a diminished chance of survival.

"Our search and rescue coordinators, they are advising us [that] with expert medical survival information, with water, with food, the chance of survival would be much greater," he said.

"We don't know but whilst ever there's a possibility if young William is out there and he does have some water, we'll continue to search for him whilst that survival state is still there."

Police divers have already searched dams and waterways, and searchers on trail bikes and horses have spent hours scouring scrub near the house where he disappeared.

Up to 300 people have been taking part in the search.

Police have said they cannot rule out the possibility the boy was abducted, and the ABC has been told police are also speaking with all known sex offenders in the region.

However, Superintendent Fehon said that police have no evidence to indicate this was the case either.

Police strike force Rossann has now been set up to investigate the disappearance.

Superintendent Fehon said 30 police investigators were consulting with the state crime squad.

"We are appealing for anyone who saw any people or vehicles in the vicinity of Benaroon Drive or in the Kendall township on Friday to contact police," he said.

"The search to locate William and his survival is definitely our priority, but we have an open mind and we are broadening our investigation teams at present.

"We just ask if there's any members of the public at all that know of anyone that was in the Kendall area or was visiting the Kendall area last Friday before 11:00am, any information at all, if they could contact Crime Stoppers - 1800 333 000.

"We are after any lead whatsoever to try and find where young William is."

William's family has urged anyone with information about his whereabouts to contact police.

"The family want to extend a heartfelt thank you to all of the police, the SES, every volunteer, every community member that has come together over the last few days to help with the search," a family friend told reporters yesterday.

William Tyrell: Missing boy could not survive six days in bush, police say

Updated - ABC

Police say they no longer believe it is possible a three-year-old boy could still be alive if he was lost in bushland on the New South Wales mid-north coast.

Three-year-old William Tyrell was last seen wearing a Spider-Man costume and playing with his sister last Friday morning at their grandmother's house at Kendall, south of Port Macquarie.

Since then hundreds of police, State Emergency Service (SES), Rural Fire Service (RFS) and members of the community have searched day and night for the child.

Audio: Police say they are baffled by the lack of clues. (The World Today)

Superintendent Paul Fehon said if William did wander into the bush, he was unlikely to still be alive.

"The experts cannot substantiate that survival in the bush would be there at this point in time," he said.

But he said there was still no solid evidence that he did wander into the bush.

Specialist police, including the sex crimes squad, have been brought in to investigate the possibility the boy was abducted.

They have formed Strike Force Rosann and are continuing to canvass local residents, as well as examine possible sightings from all over the state.

Police said they were following a lead from shop owners in Kendall who have reported that someone was asking for directions to the street where William disappeared.

"We're grateful of all the information that's been provided to us at this point in time and we are following up on all those leads of information," Superintendent Fehon said.

"We need to go through that information, collate it, analyse it and we need to substantiate or discount that information that's provided to us.

"We're still open-minded in regards to what has happened to young William.

"As I've indicated, we have no indication whether young William is out in the bush or whether other forms of human intervention have been involved.

"So again, we're appealing to any member of the public that may have known of any person or any vehicle that was to be in the vicinity of Benaroo Drive at Kendall or the township of Kendall, if they can provide that to Crime Stoppers."

Police said they had no plans to scale back the search as yet.

Today the search area has been extended to a three-kilometre radius from the grandmother's house, while trail bikes and four-wheel drives will look beyond that area.

Police divers will continue to wade through local waterways after spending the past few days searching dams on nearby properties.

"As the search continues, of course the number of volunteers have diminished, but in regards to our resources that we have here we've continued with the numbers," Superintendent Fehon said.

"We will be looking at different facets of searching as I've indicated - trail bikes, four-wheel drives - as the ground search in this area is completed we will look at the broader area in the vicinity."

 

William Tyrell: Someone knows something about missing boy, police say

Updated

Police searching for a three-year-old boy who went missing from his grandmother's home on the New South Wales mid-north coast last week said they believed "someone knows something" about his disappearance.

William Tyrell was last seen wearing a Spider-Man costume while playing with his sister before vanishing from his grandmother's home at Kendall last Friday morning.

Inspector Paul Fehon said he could not understand why no trace of the young boy had been found.

"In a way it's baffling that we haven't received any further leads considering the time that has passed since he went missing," Inspector Fehon said.

"The report of a young three year old playing in the backyard and then in the space of five minutes being found to be missing, of course the natural reaction was to search in the heavily dense bushland.

"We can only appeal for people out there, if human intervention took place, someone knows something."

Search area to be extended from 10 to 20 kilometres

Over the past seven days, hundreds of State Emergency Service crews, specialist police and community volunteers have combed 10 square kilometres of bushland in their mission to find William.

Inspector Fehon said the search would now be extended to 20 kilometres and more than 70 searchers would use trail bikes and four-wheel-drive vehicles to continue the operation.

He said it was now a search rather than a rescue operation and that if William had wandered into the bush he was unlikely to still be alive.

Specialist police, including the sex crimes squad, have been brought in to investigate the possibility William was abducted.

They had formed Strike Force Rosann and were continuing to canvass local residents, as well as examine possible sightings from around the state.

Assistant Commissioner Stuart Wilkins joined the search and thanked volunteers and emergency services workers for their efforts.

He also foreshadowed the possibility that the operation might be scaled back by Friday afternoon.

William Tyrell: Search for 3yo to be scaled back

Updated - ABC

A search for a three-year-old boy who went missing from his grandmother's home on the New South Wales mid-north coast last week is to be scaled back.

Hundreds of people have spent days scouring bushland around the property at Kendall, south of Port Macquarie, looking for William Tyrell.

Police said the search would continue into its seventh day on Thursday but would be scaled back.

William was wearing a Spider-Man costume had had been playing with his sister when he vanished last Friday morning.

Police officers, State Emergency Service (SES), Rural Fire Service (RFS) and members of the community have searched day and night for him.

Superintendent Paul Fehon said it was now a search rather than a rescue operation.

He said if William had wandered into the bush he was unlikely to still be alive.

"The experts cannot substantiate that survival in the bush would be there at this point in time," he said.

But he said there was still no solid evidence he had gone into the bush.

Specialist police, including the sex crimes squad, have been brought in to investigate the possibility William was abducted.

They have formed Strike Force Rosann and are continuing to canvass local residents, as well as examine possible sightings from all over the state.

Police said they were following a lead from shop owners in Kendall who had reported someone had asked for directions to the street William disappeared from.

"We're grateful of all the information that's been provided to us at this point in time and we are following up on all those leads of information," Superintendent Fehon said.

"We need to go through that information, collate it, analyse it and we need to substantiate or discount that information that's provided to us.

"We're still open-minded in regards to what has happened to young William.

"As I've indicated, we have no indication whether young William is out in the bush or whether other forms of human intervention have been involved.

"So again, we're appealing to any member of the public that may have known of any person or any vehicle that was to be in the vicinity of Benaroon Drive at Kendall or the township of Kendall, if they can provide that to Crime Stoppers."

On Tuesday the search area was extended to a three-kilometre radius from the grandmother's house, while trail bikes and four-wheel drives looked beyond that area.

Police divers waded through local waterways after spending the past few days searching dams on nearby properties.

 

William Tyrell: Search for missing boy shifts to road near grandmother's home

Updated - ABC

The search for a three-year-old boy who went missing on the New South Wales mid-north coast a week ago has shifted to a road near his grandmother's home where he was last seen.

William Tyrell was last seen wearing a Spider-Man costume while playing with his sister before vanishing from the home at Kendall, south of Port Macquarie, last Friday morning.

For the past eight days more than 70 police and emergency services workers have conducted exhaustive searches of the area, using trail bikes and four-wheel-drive vehicles, but have failed to find any trace of the boy.

Local Area Commander Superintendent Paul Fehon said today's investigations focussed on looking for clues near a main road close to where William was last seen, and asking drivers whether they had seen anything suspicious last Friday.

"Our search people are back out there predominantly in that wider area around the Middle Brother Mountain, looking for any clues that may indicate that young William may have been out in that area," Inspector Fehon said.

"Today we are also canvassing people driving along the Batar Creek Road, who may have been coming along that route last Friday," he said.

"We're just seeing if they saw anything, if they saw any vehicle or person, suspicious or not suspicious."

Police hope to jog drivers' memories

Since William disappeared emergency service crews, police and volunteers have combed dense bushland as part of a huge search.

Local Area Commander Superintendent Paul Fehon said the latest strategy was designed to try and jog the memory of regular drivers in the area.

"We were mainly trying to see if anyone saw anyone on that exact occasion, or if they saw anything either in the township of Kendall or further back on the outskirts of Kendall," Inspector Fehon said.

He said it was now a search rather than a rescue operation and that if William had wandered into the bush he was unlikely to still be alive.

Specialist police, including the sex crimes squad, have been brought in to investigate the possibility William was abducted.

They had formed Strike Force Rosann and were continuing to canvass local residents, as well as examine possible sightings from around the state.

William Tyrell: Search for missing 3yo boy scaled back; police to focus on information about unexplained disappearance

Updated   - ABC

The search for missing three-year-old boy William Tyrell has been scaled back nine days after he disappeared from his grandmother's home on the NSW mid-north coast.

Emergency services told a community meeting on Sunday afternoon that the investigation would now focus on the many pieces of information received since his unexplained disappearance.

William was last seen about 10.30am on Friday, September 12, at his grandmother's home in Benaroon Drive, Kendall. He was wearing a Spider-Man costume and was playing with his sister when he vanished.

Police and volunteers, including personnel from the SES, RFS and Surf Lifesaving, have scoured an area covering almost 50 square kilometres during the past nine days, but have failed to find any trace of the boy.

Last week police said it was unlikely that William would be found alive and it was now a recovery operation.

Operation Commander Superintendent Paul Fehon paid tribute to the dedication and commitment shown by all those involved in the search and a letter of thanks from William's parents was read to those at the community meeting.

"Thank you does not seem like the right sort of word to express our gratitude and heartfelt warmth we feel towards each and every one of you," the letter said.

"We have been completely overwhelmed with the way the public, SES, Surf Life Saving, RFS and the police have rallied together to find our little Spider-Man William.

"You didn't know us and we didn't know you, but today we feel that we are a part of your extended community and we are warmed and comforted by the way you have shared our love for William."

The family said they hoped William would be able to fulfil his dream of becoming a firefighter.

"William is only three years and three months old and really still a baby, he has so many more years to live and we desperately want him home," the family said in the statement.

"William up until a month ago was obsessed with all things fire engine and would tell us his name was 'Firefighter William', a future he deserves to fulfil.

"We pray and hope that our 'Firefighter William' comes home soon."

On Saturday Superintendent Fehon again appealed to the public to let police know if they had any information about the boy's disappearance.

"There must be someone out there who knows something about William's unexplained disappearance," he said.

Police have said they cannot rule out the possibility the boy was abducted, and the ABC has been told police are also speaking with all known sex offenders in the region.

However, Supt Fehon said that police have no evidence to indicate this was the case either.

Police are urging anyone with information about William's disappearance to call Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000 or use the Crime Stoppers online reporting page

William Tyrell: Family issues heartfelt letter of thanks to community involved in search for 3yo

Updated - ABC

The family of three-year-old William Tyrell, who went missing from the New South Wales mid-north coast over a week ago, have issued a letter of thanks to everyone involved in the search for him.

Police and volunteers are continuing to search bushland south of Kendall in an effort to find William, who disappeared from his grandmother's Kendall home on Friday, September 12.

Earlier this week police said it was unlikely that William would be found alive and it was now a recovery operation.

William's family released a letter on Saturday thanking everyone involved in the search for the boy who loved wearing his Spider-Man costume.

"Thank you does not seem like the right sort of word to express our gratitude and heartfelt warmth we feel towards each and every one of you," the letter said.

"We have been completely overwhelmed with the way the public, SES, Surf Life Saving, RFS and the police have rallied together to find our little Spider-Man William.

William is only three years and three months old and really still a baby, he has so many more years to live and we desperately want him home
William Tyrell's family

"You didn't know us and we didn't know you, but today we feel that we are a part of your extended community and we are warmed and comforted by the way you have shared our love for William."

The family said they hoped William would be able to fulfil his dream of becoming a firefighter.

"William is only three years and three months old and really still a baby, he has so many more years to live and we desperately want him home," the family said in the statement.

"William up until a month ago was obsessed with all things fire engine and would tell us his name was 'Firefighter William', a future he deserves to fulfil.

"We pray and hope that our 'Firefighter William' comes home soon."

Police Local Area Commander Superintendent Paul Fehon also paid tribute to the persistence and dedication shown by the NSW community, especially those from Kendall, who have helped look for William.

He again appealed to the public to let police know if they had any information about the boy's disappearance.

"There must be someone out there who knows something about William's unexplained disappearance," Supt Fehon said.

For the past eight days more than 70 police and emergency services workers have conducted exhaustive searches of the area, using trail bikes and four-wheel-drive vehicles, but have failed to find any trace of the boy.

Police have said they cannot rule out the possibility the boy was abducted, and the ABC has been told police are also speaking with all known sex offenders in the region.

However, Supt Fehon said that police have no evidence to indicate this was the case either.

Mid North Coast Police remain committed to solving William Tyrell's mysterious disappearance

Posted - ABC

Today marks two weeks to the day since 3 year old William Tyrell went missing from Kendall south of Port Macquarie.

He was last seen on the morning of Friday September 12, 2014 at his grandmother's home at Kendall.

The little boy was wearing a Spider-Man costume and was playing with his sister when he vanished.

Long time Kendall resident Kay Smith said the community is shocked by William's disappearance and parents are keeping a close watch on their children.

"Everyone in Kendall has families and young children," she said.

"Just about has got families and young children and they used to be just able to let them go out and play at the parks and play footy at the footy ground.

"Now they are not game to let them go out too far from the door."

Meanwhile Mid North Coast Police say they are as committed as ever to solving the mysterious disappearance.

They say despite an exhaustive search of 50 square kilometres of bushland around Kendall, no trace of William has been found.

Acting Local Area Commander Alan Joyce said a Strike Force has been established and the investigation has not let-up.

"It is frustrating that there is not a lot of physical evidence or even witness evidence to go on," he said.

"However we're not backing away from the task at hand and we are sifting through every bit of information that we possibly can to help find him.

"But at the same time we are still urging people to give us a call.

"There's someone out there who knows what happened and we're urging anyone that knows, or heard something, or saw something to please contact us."

William Tyrell vanished from the the town of Kendall

 

THREE-year-old boys don't tend to walk up steep hills. They run down them.

They don't tend to bolt into thick scrub and have it rip through their tender skin, either. Especially when the option is an acre of soft and manicured lawn to trip over on.

And that is what is frightening the hell out of the people of Kendall.

Two months ago the little mid-north coast town on the banks of the Camden Haven River was any town in NSW, where shopkeepers still busily swept non-existent dust off the pavement and young lads leant on the trays of their farm utes, having a yarn.

Now there is a black cloud hanging over the rolling green fields surrounding the place, nestled a few kilometres from where the old Pacific Highway had cut through Kew on its way to Kempsey and beyond.

And the cloud has a name - William Tyrell.

Because, if they are to allow commonsense to take over their thoughts, then the townsfolk can't help but think that the worst may well have happened to the little Spider-Man wannabe.

It was the morning of Friday, September 12, when mystery came knocking on a town where no one used to lock their doors.

William and his family had arrived from Sydney the previous night to visit his grandmother at her two-storey home on Benaroon Drive, on the outskirts of town.

The Queenslander sits on a corner block, atop a hill that looks back down the street. Behind it, in all directions, is thick scrub.

If you take out the small dirt track off Benaroon Drive, which winds several hundred metres up to a cemetery where William's grandfather is buried, or another dirt track that meanders up another side of a ridge, the street is the only way in and out.

And the walk up both tracks is steep. Very steep.

Most of the 21 homes built in this estate sit well back on their lots, giving their residents a full view of most of the goings-on, if they are so inclined.

But these people are comfortable with each other. They might look after pets when others head off for a few days, and keep an eye out for the postie or the garbo, but they keep to themselves.

"It's just a normal neighbourhood," resident Richard Wilson says.

"We have had a couple of Christmas parties on the next door neighbour's block and everyone is invited. But you don't spend your life looking at what other people are doing."

And it appears that is the case on this specific spring morning.

There are loads of things for little children to keep themselves occupied.

William's mother had already snapped a photo of the little bloke on his grandmother's verandah, playing with crayons and wearing a blue and red Spider-Man jumpsuit. It would become the image that has burnt itself into the minds of so many.

With his grandmother sitting on the back deck, and his mum inside making a cuppa, William and his four-year-old sister start playing "chaseys". It's about 10.30am.

It's less than five minutes before they realise. William is gone. And thin air type of gone.

Neighbours are roused and start the frantic search. Police are called within a few minutes.

And within a few hours a qualified search co-ordinator is running the show.

But nothing. The days drift by and still nothing.

Seven weeks have now passed since William went from playing with his sister to becoming the centre of one of the most mysterious missing person cases in Australia.

"I can truthfully say that nothing has been discounted," Superintendent Paul Fehon of the mid-north coast local area command says.

"Our starting point is an approximate five-minute window where William has walked around the side of the house and has gone.

"We are still at that starting point."

So did William simply walk into the bush and vanish?

Nine days were spent meticulously searching the bush, firstly in the adjacent Kendall State Forest and then the Middle Brother State Forest a little further away.

They looked for any sign of him. From pieces of cloth torn off his little suit, to a body.

They used cameras to send down drains and sewer pipes. And then double checked them. Nothing.

Neighbour Paul Savage was one of the first to start searching for William after his frantic neighbour screamed that he was missing.

"If he had wandered, he would have been found," Savage says.

"When I go for a walk you still find yourself keeping an eye out, hoping for a scream or a yell and not a horrible smell.

"I don't know how his family has coped, it must be torture for them."

All the homes in the estate were searched. And then searched again.

Missing kids are found hiding under beds and in cupboards more times than wandering the streets. But not in this case.

"We have had police through three times," Richard Wilson says.

"Every cupboard, they have had a look in the ceilings, have had a look in the boots of cars."

Police continue to keep an open mind on all possibilities. It is their job to. Investigations - especially the drawn-out kind - have an infinite number of leads and possible scenarios about them.

There have been hundreds of pieces of information handed over to CrimeStoppers since William vanished.

It is not up to detectives to identify a suspect and throw all their resources into getting the brief up on them.

Instead, they meticulously work on excluding suspects. That also means delving into those closer to home.

William has a complicated family history and, for legal reasons, his family cannot be identified.

And that, in itself, has started gossip. But there is no history of family conflict. Everyone has been interviewed and the whereabouts of all relatives checked out and verified.

Police have also looked up known child sex offenders within a massive radius of Kendall with nothing to grab at.

"I can't say I look at any locals differently, but I guess you never know," Kendall Cellars owner Rheannon Chapman says.

"There is that fear that you never know. Who knows what goes on behind closed doors?

"Until we know. It is the unknown.

"I change every day. Some days I think he has been taken and others I think we have just missed him in the bush somewhere. That bush is a big place.

"Although we spent hundreds of man hours out there, it is still a big place."

Chapman said she has heard about the man who had walked into one of the businesses in town and asked for directions to near where William went missing. She believes the story is true.

"I think the police side of things, the suspicion, was there straight away," she says.

"Just little things like looking at our CCTV. We were told not to delete anything and that was the next day.

"I just thought we would find him."

But Superintendent Fehon says there was nothing concrete to point to abduction, or "human intervention", as he puts it.

It is a rabbit warren to get to William's grandmother's house. His mother was looking out the kitchen window making a cuppa when he vanished and she saw nothing.

Not one neighbour saw anything untoward. How do you happen across a child that no one except family know is there, and then, in an instant, snatch him?

"It is out of town and out of the way. Who would be driving there on that Friday morning at that time," Superintendent Fehon said.

"It is a dead-end street."

Hardly anyone in Kendall had ever met the boy whose image on his grandmother's patio in that red and blue suit is now so familiar.

A kid whose fate has irrevocably changed the lives of most of the 2000-odd locals.

Children are not walking home from school any more - many mothers are picking their children up from bus stops less than 100 metres from their front doors - and there is a lack of youngsters playing in the street or in front yards.

Chapman, who has lived in the town since she was 10, now has her 10-year-old son catch the bus to her in-laws' house.

"I just can't get myself [to let him walk home]," Chapman says.

"It is so quiet - hardly any kids walk home. I sat [out the front of the school] on Friday and I think I saw less than 10 walking home when it would normally be the whole town."

Desley Copeland finds herself parked at the start of Benaroon Drive every afternoon these days.

She is across the road from the bus stop where the kids used to be dropped off and walk home, giggling as kids do.

"You don't see them out playing in yards any more, you used to see them riding up and down on their bikes," she says.

"And that is really sad. Because everybody looks after everybody's kids.

"We always had our eye out. If you saw one of them with a skinned knee you would pull over and help."

But the town has changed, possibly forever.

"Nobody knew where Kendall was before the 12th of September," Chapman says.

"I have grown up here, I have my own family here, I own a business here, my husband is the same.

"You get this kind of blanket where you want to protect it.

"But at the same time you don't want anyone to forget William's face because, for us as well, not just his parents and grandparents, it is our town as well."

A local for 26 years, Sandree Peterson worked on feeding the searchers from before dawn to well after dusk.

She says the William Tyrell story has broken the heart of the town, which continued to press on even when all seemed lost.

"That is what happens here. It doesn't matter who it is or what is wrong, people will always look after one another," Peterson says.

"Everyone was just so distressed at the end of it all, even the hardest police officers shed a few tears. The whole town is so devastated, there is not a person it has not touched."

There was a quote from one of the locals not long after the search for William had begun. It has almost become a motto: "If he is out there, we will find him. If he is not, he will find us."

William Tyrell, 3, still missing after six weeks and police admit they have no leads on whether he wandered off or was abducted

 

He is the little boy who simply vanished. Six weeks ago William Tyrell disappeared from his grandmother’s garden on the mid-north coast and the officer in charge admits police have no new leads, no clues as to whether the three-year-old wandered off or was abducted.

Superintendent Paul Fehon is careful with the language he uses, mindful to not cause more distress to William’s family. Detectives with the homicide squad and the child sex abuse squad have both been helping with the inquiry and cadaver dogs have combed the area for kilometres around the peaceful village of Kendall.

But Supt Fehon does not want to dwell on what can be the harsh reality when the squads who handle the tough cases become involved.

“I’m not going to have those terms out there muddying the waters until we find out what has happened to young William,” he said yesterday.

There are chilling parallels with the case of missing three-year-old Madeleine McCann, who disappeared seven years ago from her family’s holiday villa at the Portuguese holiday resort of Praia da Luz.

As in Madelaine’s case, no one saw William go.

He and his sister had arrived from their Sydney home with their parents on the evening of Thursday, September 11. About 10.30am on the Friday, the two children were chasing each other around outside the back of their grandmother’s house.

The house is at the closed end of Benaroon Drive, a cul-de-sac, and surrounded on three sides by bush. William’s mum went to make a cup of tea. His grandmother was sitting in the garden.

The boy was out of sight for between one and five minutes. No one heard a car, no one heard any screams or cries.

His four-year-old sister did not see what happened. But William had gone.

Within five minutes, his parents raised the alarm and ran to alert neighbours. Within 20 minutes the police were there. By 1pm, there were more than 100 people searching.

“If he has just wandered off of his own accord and met with misadventure, we would have found something by now,” Supt Fehon said.

“We can’t rule out opportunistic human intervention but if that was the case, then the chances of everything aligning for that to take place is unbelievable.

“I would say that someone does know something but that would only be speculation.”

Every one of the 21 houses in the exclusive estate around the grandmother’s house have been searched from top to bottom twice, including roof cavities and septic tanks.

Supt Fehon is no stranger to baffling searches. With fellow superintendent Peter Thurtell, he led the nation’s longest and largest manhunt, which ended when fugitive Malcolm Naden was found in March 2012 in a remote cabin, west of Gloucester.

He modestly describes that as an “organisational achievement” and says it is the same way to solve the disappearance of William. Solid police work.

Strike Force Rosann is now following up hundreds of calls to CrimeStoppers including sightings of William. Even reports from clairvoyants, traditionally treated with scepticism, are being chased up.

The investigation will go on indefinitely. “You can’t let a three-year-old boy just go missing and not continue with the investigation,” he said.