Sevak SIMONIAN

 

Circumstances:

Sevak Simonian was last seen at his home in Belrose NSW on Monday 20 October 2014. He was reported missing by his family on 23 October after they became concerned about not hearing from him.
Sevak was a keen bushwalker. On the 24 October his vehicle was located at the Kanangra Walls car park at Kanangra Boyd National Park. There was no sign of Sevak where the vehicle was found.
Despite several extensive searches, Sevak is still missing.
It is out of character for Sevak to not contact his family or friends, especially for such a length of time.
If you have information that may assist police to locate Sevak please call Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000.

 

Bosses should give workers time off to search for missing Sydney man Sevak Simonian: Dick Smith

Entrepreneur and adventurer Dick Smith has called on bosses to give workers time off so they can assist the search for a Sydney man missing for eight days in a national park near Oberon in central western NSW.

Sevak Simonian, 21, has not been seen since he left his parents' home at Belrose in Sydney's north about 8pm on October 20.

His parents reported him missing to police, and his friends then came forward saying he was headed to the Kanangra-Boyd National Park near Oberon.

His car was found in the Kanangra Walls Road car park on October 24.

Police on Wednesday said they believed Mr Simonian entered the park on October 21 but only had a day pack with him when he disappeared.

Mr Smith said he was alarmed when he discovered on Tuesday morning that Mr Simonian had still not been found.

He spent two hours on Tuesday searching the national park in his helicopter. 

He said that, from speaking to police, it is understood 25 skilled bushwalkers were helping with the search effort but he said there needed to be more. 

"The best way to find someone who is lost in the bush is to have lots of people walking in the bush. If you're a bushwalker, a canyoner or a rock climber, get in touch with the police and offer the fact that you could go and also for bosses to give them the time off," he said.

"Police are concerned about people going in there not skilled but there are hundreds of very skilled bushwalkers in Sydney and they are not there because they don't know anything about it."

 

Mr Smith said that, while Mr Simonian had been missing for eight days, he believed Mr Simonian could be alive because there was plenty of water about.

Barry Washington, a friend and colleague of Mr Simonian at Bunnings in Narrabeen, said Mr Simonian loved the outdoors, and had been bushwalking on his own since he was 13.

"His passion is bushwalking, that's what he does. He loves it out there, he'd live out there forever if he could. Sometimes he stays out at Barrington Tops [National Park in the Hunter Valley] for two weeks, he likes to live off the land," said Mr Washington, who has been part of the team searching for Mr Simonian.

"He knows how to survive out there, to build shelters. He knows what he can and can't eat and drink."

Mr Washington said that, while Mr Simonian had previously been away on bushwalking trips for weeks, he would always let his employer know that he would be away. He never missed turning up to work, Mr Washington said.

"He never, ever does not come into work without calling in sick. He's responsible with work," Mr Washington said.

"He is a very fit guy, he is very health conscious. He's an organic eater, doesn't smoke or drink; he is one of the fittest people I know and strong as an ox."

Mr Washington said it was a "miserable day with low cloud cover" when Mr Simonian disappeared, and he may have lost his way or decided to take shelter to wait out the weather.

"My opinion is that if he is not injured and he has made it to a creek, he will last for an immense amount of time.

"If he is injured, he is capable of still getting out of there. He's the sort of guy that wouldn't panic," he said.

Mr Washington said Mr Simonian was not depressed, and had recently spoken about his plans for the future.

"He was saving up to buy a farm. He wants to live in the bush. He's just a good lovable kid. A very quiet guy, he likes to keep to himself. He would have gone out there for an adventure, I reckon, and the fog cover's gone too low," Mr Washington said.

Mr Simonian is described as being about 180 centimetres tall, with a thin build, olive skin, short black curly hair and brown eyes.

Mr Washington urged volunteers who want to help in the search to contact Oberon police station.

 

Lost in the wilderness: Hunt continues for Sevak

IT is a wilderness of majestic cliffs and plunging valleys that has claimed lives and changed others forever — but missing bushwalker Sevak Simonian’s parents hope he is one of the lucky ones.

The 21-year-old has been missing for 11 days in the deadly bush of the Kanangra-Boyd National Park, with only a day’s supply of food and water.

A police cadaver dog joined the search yesterday in an area that even highly skilled bushwalkers do not enter alone.

In 2000, Newcastle University Mountaneering Club members Steve Rogers, 26, and Mark Charles, 25, froze to death, tangled in their ropes at Carra Beangra Falls, while 35 years earlier abseiler Dick Donaghey was saved in a dramatic rescue involving 500 bushwalkers who took turns dragging and carrying his stretcher up a track called Murdering Gully.

 

National Parks and Wildlife Services area manager Kim De Govrik said up to a dozen walkers get lost in the park every year. “We find most people within a week — a search like this is exceptional but it is a very difficult terrain,” Mr De Govrik said. “It’s like searching for a needle in a haystack.”

Massis and Rosa Simonian are adamant their son must be found — dead or alive. But the northern beaches couple and their sons Sasoon and Areen are clinging to the hope that he will be found alive.

“We are still waiting and hoping. We will never give up,” Mr Simonian said.

Detectives are now searching the experienced bushwalker’s computer for clues of his planned route.

More than 40 people, including volunteer bushwalkers and cave specialists, scoured bushland near where his car was discovered on a dirt track near Kanangra Wall, near Oberon.

Two helicopters searched deeper into the valley but the dense scrub made it almost impossible to spot anything from the air.

Mr Simonian, who works at Bunnings, left his parents’ house on October 20 saying he was going bushwalking in the Blue Mountains.

After his family reported him missing, police searched popular walking routes for his car and discovered it parked at Kanangara Wall last Friday.

Inspector Chris Sammut told searchers yesterday morning that while there is a chance the walker could be found, reality could not be ignored.

“We have to be realistic, there’s every chance he has perished,” Insp Sammut said.

But two experienced bushwalkers involved in rescues in the 1960s said there was still a chance he may survive. David Roots, 83, who lead the rescue of Dick Donaghey, said there is plenty of water.

“But all the creeks come up to Kanangra Walls so if he is lost and still mobile he should be able to get to the many sources of water.”

 

EXCLUSIVE: Brother of missing Sevak Simonian speaks about #FindSevak

Source: Caroline Geroyan - armenia.com.au | Friday, 31 October 2014

 

 

SYDNEY: Sevak Simonian, 21, has now been missing for 11 days. The young Armenian-Australian from Belrose, in Sydney’s north, was last seen at his parents' home at about 8pm on Monday the 20th of October.

Friends stated he was headed for the Kanangra-Boyd National Park near Oberon, where he is believed to be lost. On the 24th of October his car was found in the Kanangra Walls Road car park and police believe that Mr Simonian entered the park on October 21 but only had a daypack with him when he disappeared.

Sevak’s brother, Sasoon Simonian, spoke to 
Armenia Online, saying that his younger brother enjoyed bushwalking but would only go for a day at a time, never as long as 10 days or so.

“He went every now and then," Sasoon Simonian said. "If he had a few days off he would go for a day walk but he would never just disappear, he is very reliable.”

The search party for Sevak Simonian began on Monday but Sasoon says that it has been limited because they need skilled SES volunteers, which there is a shortage of.

“It is frustrating and difficult because we have manpower and there are so many people who want to help but you cant just turn up and start searching, because then you will become the liability.”

On Tuesday 28th of October, Australian entrepreneur Dick Smith joined the search with his helicopter. He was alarmed when he found out that Sevak had still not been found.

Police had confirmed to Mr Smith that 25 skilled bushwalkers were helping with the search effort but he said there needed to be more.

"The best way to find someone who is lost in the bush is to have lots of people walking in the bush. If you're a bushwalker, a canyoner or a rock climber, get in touch with the police and offer the fact that you could go and also for bosses to give them the time off," he said.

Mr Smith also told the Sydney Morning Herald that bosses should give their employees a day off work to search for Sevak if they are part of the SES.

Sevak’s borther, Sasoon Simonian, couldn’t agree more.

Sasoon Simonian added: “Dick Smith donated $30,000 as part of the search and he was involved for a day looking with his chopper but it is on the authorities to get people into the bush because they have the power.”

To raise awareness, Sasoon has been speaking with Channel 7, the Sydney Morning Herald, the Daily Telegraph, 2UE and 2GB.

“My focus isn’t on the search because I can't do anything," Sasoon told 
Armenia Online. "I want to raise awareness, to get people out there searching for my brother. I went on 2GB a few days ago, and this morning spoke with Stuart Bocking on 2UE. Channel 7 was yesterday.”

Sevak Simonian’s classmate from Galstaun College, Tomik Torosian, and his peers are also experiencing the same frustration when it comes to looking for their friend, Sevak.

“I personally have spoken to members of the [Armenian] community and with the AYF (Armenian Youth Federation of Australia). I have also spoken to our entire [Galstaun College] class. We want to help but and have made calls and reached out but we are a small group – we need to get resourceful.”

 

Members of the Armenian community have used social media to raise awareness of Sevak’s disappearance and to find skilled volunteers. The #findsevak campaign has picked up fierce momentum but more experienced hikers are needed.

Australian news presenter George Donikian, SBS football host Les Murray, and CommSec Market Analyst Steven Daghlian have all used the hashtag #findsevak to raise awareness of the campaign and ensure Sevak is found.

 

Sasoon Simonian feels that more media awareness is paramount to collecting more experienced hikers, and that the media should be doing more at this point.

“The Facebook and Twitter campaigns have been good at raising awareness amongst the Armenian and wider Australian communities," Sasoon said. "We have been putting the word out to the community leaders, such as Vache Kahramanian from the ANC (Armenian National Committee of Australia) and the Armenian Church."

The AYF, ANC and Galstaun College are all in regular contact with SES and NSW Police, obtaining as much information as they can in regards to the search effort and offering their manpower in all ways possible. The main aim of the Armenian community, which Sevak is a valued member of, is to get him home safely.

“To find more skilled volunteers I feel like the media needs to do more. There needs to be a more serious sense of urgency,” said Sasoon.

“We are here on standby and we will do whatever it takes,” said Tomik. "I will not settle with 'he can’t be found'. He’s a human being. Someone from our community is out there and until we find out what happened we need to help in as many ways as possible. They can’t just stop searching for Sevak.”

Missing hiker’s shoes, gear found at parents’ home


 

 

 

BATHURST police have found hiking shoes and camping gear during a search of Sevak Simonian’s parents’ home in Sydney.
 

The search was conducted after the 21-year-old went missing in Kanangra-Boyd National Park near Oberon on October 20.

Mr Simonian was last seen by his parents and, despite a call for witnesses to come forward, the young man has not been seen since.

But Chifley Local Area Command Inspector Colin Cracknell said the discovery of camping items at his parents’ home did not mean Mr Simonian had forgotten to take them.

“We found hiking shoes and a backpack ... at the residence, but that’s not to say he doesn’t have two sets,” he said.

Inspector Cracknell said the young man’s parents reported no food had been taken from the family home. “Just because there’s no evidence of food being taken from his home, doesn’t mean he didn’t purchase any,” he said.

“We also seized his computer to see what areas he’s been searching so we can narrow down our search.”

Police have also searched the missing man’s car after it was discovered in the Kanangra Walls Road car park, but Inspector Cracknell said they found nothing of concern and the car did not look like it had been tampered with.

It has almost been two weeks since Mr Simonian [pictured] went missing, yet police and emergency service are continuing the search in the national park.

“We’ve pretty much searched everywhere that has readily accessible water,” Inspector Cracknell said. “Police are perplexed that with all the activity in the area, he hasn’t made himself known.

“We have grave fears for his safety.”

Mr Simonian is described as being about 180cm tall, with a thin build, olive skin, short black curly hair and brown eyes.

Anyone with information about Mr Simonian’s whereabouts is urged to come forward.

Police have also asked members of the public who may have seen Mr Simonian or his car between Tuesday, October 21 and Friday, October 24 to come forward.

His car, which has since been towed by police, is a white 2006 Ford Falcon station wagon with registration number BR 45 HY.

If you have information, call Oberon Police Station on 6336 1000 or Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000.

 

Chifley police end search for missing man Sevak Simonian


THE search for a Sydney man missing for three weeks in the Kanangra Boyd National Park has been officially suspended.

Sevak Simonian was reported missing on the night of Thursday, October 23 after last being seen when he left his Belrose home the previous Monday.

His car was found in the Kanangara Walls Road car park on Friday, October 24 but an extensive search since then has failed to find any trace of the missing man.

Police from Chifley local area command and Police Rescue have been co-ordinating the search for 21-year-old, utilising resources from the local police and specialist police from the Rescue Squad, Dog Unit, and Police airwing, PolAir, as well as personnel from National Parks and Wildlife Service (NP&WS), NSW Ambulance Paramedics and volunteers from the State Emergency Service (SES), Rural Fire Service (RFS), Volunteer Rescue Association (VRA), and the Bushwalkers Wilderness Rescue Squad.

A NP&WS helicopter was also utilised along with specialist vertical rescue teams to search canyons, waterfalls and steep ridges within a 3km radius of the car park where Sevak’s vehicle was located. The Westpac Rescue helicopter also provided assistance.

After a review of the operation, police yesterday spoke with Mr Simonian’s family to advise them the search was being suspended pending further information.

[A command centre set up to help co-ordinate the search for Sevak Simonian]

A command centre set up to help co-ordinate the search for Sevak Simonian

“We would like to thank everyone involved in the search, especially the huge number of volunteers who gave up their time to assist police,” Chifley local area commander Superintendent Michael Robinson said today.

“While the search has been suspended, an investigation into Sevak’s disappearance is ongoing.

“We would again urge anyone who is considering entering the bush – even for a short walk – to “Think before you TREK.”

T: Take adequate supplies of food, water, navigation and first aid equipment.

R: Register your planned route and tell friends and family when you expect to return.

E: Emergency beacons are available free of charge from police & National Parks & Wildlife Service.

K: Keep to your planned route and follow the map and walking trails.

Visit http://www.trek.nsw.gov.au for more information.

* Police are urging anyone with information in relation to this incident to call Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000 or use the Crime Stoppers online reporting page at nsw.crimestoppers.com.au/

Information will be treated in the strictest of confidence.

Police remind people they should not report crime information via our Facebook and Twitter pages.

Social media campaign helps fund search for Sevak Simonian

 - Western Advocate

A CAMPAIGN launched on social media has raised more than $12,000 to contribute towards costs in the search for missing Belrose bushwalker Sevak Simonian.

The fundraising effort was established by Gilbert Verdian and has raised $12,400.

Mr Verdian, who did not know Mr Simonian, said people from the Northern Beaches community had donated to the fund, which has been used to pay for additional air cover in the search.

Mr Simonian, 21, from Belrose, has not been seen since he left for a bushwalk on Monday, October 20. His car was found at a car park at Kanangra Boyd National Park four days later.

Mr Verdian said he heard about Mr Simonian and just wanted to do something to help.

So, through social media, he started a campaign and using Facebook and Twitter raised the funds, which have since been donated to the SES.

"The SES indicated that they will use the money for helicopters that will provide critical air support and allow them to access remote terrain that would otherwise be difficult to do," Mr Verdian said.

"We want to assist and extend the search in any way possible so we can find Sevak. He is an experienced bushwalker and we are confident he can be found."

Chifley Local Area Command Inspector Colin Cracknell said the search for Mr Simonian was still underway yesterday afternoon, although numbers on the ground weren't as high as in previous days because volunteers had to go back to work.

Inspector Cracknell said the search was the largest he had ever been involved with in his 26 years of policing, with 60 volunteers actively searching the area.

plus another 15 emergency personnel manning the command post.

"It's been huge, the search is widely resourced and we have not left one stone unturned,"he said,.

 

Police give up hope of finding missing Sydney man Sevak Simonian

- Oberon Review

THE search for a Sydney man missing for almost three weeks in the Kanangra Boyd National Park has been suspended, with police giving up all hope he is still alive.

Sevak Simonian was reported missing on the night of Thursday, October 23 after last being seen when he left his Belrose home the previous Monday.

His car was found in the Kanangra Walls Road car park on Friday, October 24 but an extensive search since then has failed to find him.

Duty officer with Chifley Local Area Command Colin Cracknell, said the search was terminated at 1pm on Monday, with all personnel withdrawn from the site.

“Unfortunately, the result is a negative one,” he said, adding police will continue ongoing enquiries to try and establish Sevak’s whereabouts.

Inspector Cracknell said a report will be prepared for the coroner.

Inspector Cracknell said the decision to end the search was not taken lightly, with police only coming to the conclusion that Sevak is dead after enormous consultation with experts from the Rescue and Bomb Disposal Unit in Sydney and a specialist survival doctor who works with both NSW Police and the Australian Defence Force.

“Based on the advice of these experts we have concluded he has no chance of survival,” he said.

Inspector Cracknell said he had been in touch with Sevak’s parents and, while they are devastated at the loss of their child, they knew at some point it was inevitable the search would wind up.

“They thanked everyone who has been involved in the search, which I believe is the biggest search ever conducted within the Chifley Local Area Command,” he said.

“Unfortunately it’s the first time we’ve never not had a result. Up until now we’ve always found the person [or their remains], so in that sense this is a bit unusual,” he said.

“But in the search we have left no stone unturned, we were even airlifting people into search zones, because they weren’t accessible on foot.

“We’d plot a location on a map where they would search and then extracting them in the helicopter.

“We had a very dedicated team, hundreds of volunteers who gave of their time, freely carrying out the search.”

Inspector Cracknell also thanked the Bushwalkers Wilderness Rescue Squad, the VRA, SES, National Parks and Wildlife, Rapid Relief Team, NSW Ambulance and paramedics and the Westpac Rescue Helicopter for their assistance during the search.

 

Police renew call for information on missing man Sevak Simonian


 

 

POLICE have made a fresh appeal for information one year after Sydney man Sevak Simonian disappeared in Kanangra-Boyd National Park near Oberon.
 

Mr Simonian, then 21, was reported missing on October 23, 2014, but was last seen leaving his parents’ Belrose home three days earlier. His car was found in the Kanangra Walls Road car park on October 24.

A wide-scale search was launched in the rugged national park where Mr Simonian was known to have previously gone for bushwalks alone.

Helicopters and specialist vertical rescue teams searched canyons, waterfalls and steep ridges within a three-kilometre radius of where Mr Simonian’s vehicle was located.

Police found hiking shoes and camping gear during a search of Mr Simonian’s parents’ home on November 1.

“We found hiking shoes and a backpack ... at the residence, but that’s not to say he doesn’t have two sets,” Inspector Colin Cracknell said.

At the time a social media campaign established by fellow Northern Beaches resident Gilbert Verdian raised $12,400 to contribute to the cost of an air search.
 

Scores of volunteers gave their time to the search for Mr Simonian.

Entrepreneur and adventurer Dick Smith also called on bosses to give workers time off so they could assist the search.

The search was finally terminated on November 10, 2014.

Inspector Cracknell said the decision to end the search was not taken lightly and only done after extensive consultation with experts.

Northern Beaches detectives investigating Mr Simonian’s disappearance, under Strike Force Antare, have now appealed for anyone with information about his whereabouts or last known movements to come forward.

Mr Simonian is 180 centimetres tall, with a thin build, olive skin, short, black curly hair and brown eyes. 

Anyone with information is urged to contact Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000.